Posts Tagged 'water'

Griffiths captures ‘survivor’ women to spotlight aid work

Griffiths captures ‘survivor’ women to spotlight aid work

On her last visit to Chautauqua, Annie Griffiths, the first woman photographer for National Geographic, made a life-changing decision. That summer, she recounted in her morning lecture at 10:45 a.m. Tuesday in the Amphitheater, she decided to found Ripple Effect Images, a non-profit organization that sends top photographers and videographers to document the work of aid programs that help impoverished women and girls. Their images and videos help these organizations fundraise and spread awareness.

Young Artists to perform water-themed recital

Young Artists to perform water-themed recital

At 4:15 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ, three Young Artists will be singing songs surrounding the theme of water. Other than creating a wide-open sea of metaphor, water holds a lesson for the singers: Like the substance itself, it helps to go with the flow and be malleable.

Photos: Life on the lake

Photos: Life on the lake

Photos by Greg Funka.

Fishermen try their luck off the shore of the lake. A photographer aims to capture effect of the light from the sunrise on Chautauqua Lake. Miller Bell Tower glows after dusk. Families relax on a sunny day at Children’s Beach. Mason Hill laughs along as he pilots a boat full of Group 5 Girls.

To purchase reprints of any Daily photographs published in the print edition or online, please contact the Editorial Office at 716-357-6205.

‘Remember that words on a page never changed anything’

‘Remember that words on a page never changed anything’

The Rev. Barbara Brown Taylor suggested that after this week at Chautauqua, you might want to adopt ‘water’ as your word as you learn more about it. Her sermon title was “Even A Cup,” and her scripture was Matthew 10:40-42.

Taylor recalled the scene in the film “The Miracle Worker” when Annie Sullivan dragged Helen Keller to the water pump and thrust her hand under the running water.

“With the stuff gushing out of the pump, Helen finally got it. This was the same stuff that fell from the sky, or from her eyes, was in her bath. It was all the same stuff, and it had a name, and it changed her life,” Taylor said. “The name was water, and as she spelled it back to Annie, all the lights came on. She would never see it or hear it, but it was the beginning; it was the living word that carried her to other living words.”

Asani reflects on water in Islamic sacred texts, poetry

Asani reflects on water in Islamic sacred texts, poetry

Islam is a diverse and fluid faith. Its history of growth across geographical boundaries — and invisible cultural lines — catalyzed the creation of a variety of views related to water, Ali Asani said.

On Thursday, in the fourth Interfaith Lecture of the Week Four series themed “Water: Life Force/Life Source,” Ali Asani examined the role of water within the Islamic tradition, through an analysis of sacred texts including the Quran and the Hadith. He also explored the role of water in the mystical writings of Muslim poets in a lecture titled “Water as Substance and Symbol in Islam.”

Asani is a professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic religion and cultures at Harvard University.

Shapiro: Water moistens the soul, reawakens us as conscious beings

Shapiro: Water moistens the soul, reawakens us as conscious beings

Two guides for human relationships and responsibilities toward the earth can be found in Genesis: One is good and organic, the other is dangerous, Rabbi Rami Shapiro said.

On Wednesday, Shapiro continued with the Interfaith Lecture Week Four theme “Water: Life Force/Life Source” with a discussion of the human consciousness, attitudes toward the environment and the Jewish ritual of mikveh in a lecture titled, “The Way of the Mikveh: Water and the Reclaiming of Consciousness.”

Shapiro is the director of Wisdom House, a center for interfaith dialogue and practice in Nashville, Tenn. He is also an adjunct professor at the Middle Tennessee State University. He writes a column in Spirituality & Health magazine called “Roadside Assistance for the Spiritual Traveler.”

‘From a means of death to a means of life’

‘From a means of death to a means of life’

“If you want a crash course on the story of water in the Bible, pretend you are invited to be the chaplain at Chautauqua for Water Week,” said the Rev. Barbara Brown Taylor at the beginning of her sermon at the Tuesday morning Devotional Hour.

She continued, “List all the stories you remember about water. Once you have the obvious contenders, leave a lot of space at the end of the list for the stories that keep floating up to the surface. Choose five, because that is all you get. Until I made that list, I never realized that the story about the baby in the bulrushes was not in the common lectionary.”

Taylor’s title was “The Water Baby,” and her text was Exodus 2:1-10.

Asani shares Muslim perspective on faith, water

Asani shares Muslim perspective on faith, water

A Lutheran, Hindu and Jew walk into Chautauqua and talk about water.

Thursday, Ali Asani will add a Muslim perspective to the discussion at the 2 p.m. Interfaith Lecture in the Hall of Philosophy.

He will discuss water as it appears in core Islamic texts, both as a physical element and as a symbol.

“Islam is a broad tradition with many different interpretations,” he said. “There’s so much material; it’s definitely like an ocean, so I hardly knew where to begin. I’m hoping to give people a flavor, a taste, of a small drop from that ocean.”