Posts Tagged 'Turkey'

‘Trip Around the World’ to will bring Zakaria back to Chautauqua in 2014

‘Trip Around the World’ to will bring Zakaria back to Chautauqua in 2014

Back by popular demand, Fareed Zakaria will return to Chautauqua in 2014 to kick off Week Eight, themed “Chautauqua’s Global Public Square.”

The best-selling author of The Post-American World and the host of “Fareed Zakaria GPS,” a weekly foreign affairs newscast on CNN, Zakaria will begin a week illuminating issues from all over the world, highlighting those often ignored by American politicians and the public.

Sherra Babcock, Chautauqua Institution vice president and the Emily and Richard Smucker Chair for Education, said she believes Chautauquans will be very excited about the chance to be educated on and engage in global issues.

Kirisci sees Turkey as a future model for Middle East

Kirisci sees Turkey as a future model for Middle East

Finally answering the elusive question in the title of Week Eight’s theme, Kemal Kirişci said at Friday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater that Turkey’s status as a model for the Middle East should not be overstated. He warned against praising the country’s government as something to be emulated.

Kirişci, a senior fellow and director of the Center on the United States and Europe’s Turkey Project at the Brookings Institution, explored the question of whether the protests in Istanbul’s Taksim Square had damaged Turkey’s position as a role model for the region. His lecture was the last in this week’s theme of “Turkey: A Model for the Middle East?”

Saritoprak focuses on culture, religion, Gülen movement in Turkey

Saritoprak focuses on culture, religion, Gülen movement in Turkey

Zeki Saritoprak, the Nursi Chair in Islamic Studies at John Carroll University, considers Fethullah Gülen to be one of the most influential Muslim Turkish scholars in the late 20th century, citing his contributions to education, aid organization and interfaith dialogue.

Gülen leads the Gülen movement, also known as Hizmet, which began in the 1960s. In his 2 p.m. Interfaith Lecture today in the Hall of Philosophy, Saritoprak will discuss the movement’s significance, as well as religion and culture in Turkey.

The rise and fall of Turkey as a model for the Arab Spring

The rise and fall of Turkey as a model for the Arab Spring

Guest Column by Kemal Kirişci. Kirişci will give Friday’s Morning Lecture in the Amphitheater at 10:45 a.m.

As the Arab Spring spread from Tunisia to the rest of the Middle East early in 2011, the longtime opposition figure Rashid al-Gannouchi, also the co-founder and leader of Tunisia’s an-Nahda party, was among the many leaders who pointed to Justice and Development Party (AKP)-led Turkey as a model for guiding the transformation of the Middle East. Gannouchi maintained close relations with AKP and its leadership, which later became closely involved in Tunisia’s transformation efforts. Yet, after a May 2013 talk on “Tunisia’s Democratic Future” at The Brookings Institution, Gannouchi’s response to a question asking him which countries he thought constituted a model for Tunisia was striking because he did not mention Turkey. It is probably not a coincidence that he responded the way he did because the news about the harsh police response to the initial stages of the anti-government protests in Turkey was just breaking out. Subsequently, in an interview he gave to Jackson Diehl of The Washington Post early in June, he also took a critical view of both Mohammed Morsi and Recep Tayyip Erdoğan for their majoritarian understanding of democracy, a view that he said an-Nahda renounces. So what happened to Turkey’s model credentials? What might have led Gannouchi to change his views so dramatically? Are there any prospects for Turkey to reclaim these credentials?

Kirişci to discuss state of democracy promotion in Turkey

Kirişci to discuss state of democracy promotion in Turkey

Kemal Kirişci — the TÜSİAD senior fellow and director of the Center on the United States and Europe’s Turkey Project at Brookings Institution — will bring decades of study on his home country to the Amphitheater at 10:45 a.m. today in the final morning lecture on Week Eight’s theme, “Turkey: Model for the Middle East?”

Kirişci’s expertise in Turkish foreign policy and migration studies will guide him as he sheds light upon the question mark that looms over the end of the week’s title. The integrity of Turkey’s democratic principles has come under fire in light of the protests this past May and the government’s responsive police action. This morning, Kirişci will speak about the complexities that have recently beset the already complicated nature of democracy in the country.

Prodromou discusses Turkey’s historical, ongoing erasure of Christianity

Prodromou discusses Turkey’s historical, ongoing erasure of Christianity

Turkey is located at the crossroads of many faiths, Elizabeth Prodromou said. Nonetheless, the country’s government is systematically driving out what religious minorities it once harbored, particularly Christians.

“If there’s anything to be learned from Turkey when it comes to the future of democratization and peace in the region,” she said, “I think it’s that violations of religious rights and religious freedom and … what can be defined as policies of religious cleansing against Christianity need to be avoided.”

Doğuş’ Denizmen promotes financial literacy among Turkish women

Doğuş’ Denizmen promotes financial literacy among Turkish women

Özlem Denizmen, head of social investments for Doğuş Group — one of Turkey’s largest conglomerates — continues Chautauqua Institution’s weeklong exploration of “Turkey: Model for the Middle East?” with today’s 10:45 a.m. morning lecture in the Amphitheater. Denizmen’s talk will focus on her work promoting financial literacy and security among women in Turkey.

Denizmen was born in Turkey, educated in the United States and returned to Turkey to later become a leading entrepreneur and role model for women.

Şener: In Turkey, politicians use force instead of dialogue

Şener: In Turkey, politicians use force instead of dialogue

Nedim Şener is looking forward to seeing his wife and 10-year-old daughter when he returns to Turkey. However, his time with his family will be brief; Şener goes to trial in one month and faces seven to 15 years in prison. Held without bail, he will be allowed to see his family for 45 minutes per week.

His crime? Publicly criticizing the Turkish government.