Posts Tagged 'Tom Di Nardo'

CSO, with Seaman, Gavrylyuk, performs with ‘real orchestral unity’

CSO, with Seaman, Gavrylyuk, performs with ‘real orchestral unity’

Thursday evening’s Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra concert featured return appearances by conductor Christopher Seaman, who made his debut last season, and Ukranian-born pianist Alexander Gavrylyuk, making his sixth season visit. High humidity after a morning downpour isn’t helpful to keeping instruments in tune outdoors, but that didn’t seem to affect these responsive players.

Seaman retired last year after 13 seasons with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, and he has conducted widely in Britain, Europe and with many American orchestras; like his fellow English-born conductor Simon Rattle, he began his career as a timpanist. He chose two extended works considered inadequate youthful works by their composers, both to be revised years later.

Ioannides leads CSO through superb performance, impressive program

Ioannides leads CSO through superb performance, impressive program

For Tuesday evening’s Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra concert, conductor Sarah Ioannides chose works defined by extremely varied rhythmic structures — urgently forceful in Gershwin, throbbing and shifting-repetitive in Piazzolla, supple and pliant for Debussy and subtly tricky in Dukas.

Ioannides, making her Chautauqua debut, boasts a remarkable background. Born in Australia, she grew up in England where she began her musical training at Oxford University and the prestigious Guildhall School. She soon received a Fulbright Scholarship to study with Otto-Werner Mueller both at the Curtis Institute of Music and at The Juilliard School, eventually becoming his assistant conductor. Her many awards include those from the Bruno Walter Foundation and the JoAnn Falletta Award for most promising female conductor.

Duerr, symphony, chorus afford Brahms’ ‘Requiem’ a special propulsion

Duerr, symphony, chorus afford Brahms’ ‘Requiem’ a special propulsion

Performing a work as complex and deeply felt as Brahms’ “Ein Deutsches Requiem” is a major challenge, especially when the instrumental and vocal forces can combine for only a single rehearsal led by a conductor making his Chautauqua debut.

Yet those assembled forces brought it to vivid life. Having heard the Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus in Kleinhans Music Hall, there was little doubt about their prowess, especially in a work at the heart of their choral repertory. Baritone Tyler Duncan was also making his Chautauqua debut, with soprano Janice Chandler-Eteme a welcomed return guest.

Conductor Robert Duerr, a North Tonawanda native, minister, organist and founder of the Pasadena Chamber Orchestra, had led the chorus, and the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, last April. His extensive operatic assignments at the Metropolitan Opera and New York City Opera have enriched him with a special sense of drama — an attribute that afforded Brahms’ work the special propulsion it requires.