Posts Tagged 'The Other Wes Moore'

Moore: ‘We have no idea what type of jewels are sitting inside our juvenile justice system’

Moore: ‘We have no idea what type of jewels are sitting inside our juvenile justice system’

They came of age in the same neighborhood of the same city, both spent time in the juvenile criminal justice system, both had behavioral problems. They were both fatherless. But the two young men named Wes Moore would ultimately follow completely different paths — one became a Rhodes Scholar, a White House fellow and a decorated veteran. The other would spend life in prison for murder.

Wes Moore discovered his own name in a headline in The Baltimore Sun, referring to a suspect in a jewelry store murder. After the suspect was convicted, Moore wrote him a letter, asking the man why he committed the crime. What followed were many more letters, which turned into prison visits, which formed the basis of Moore’s book, The Other Wes Moore.

CLSC book ‘The Other Wes Moore’ gives glimpses into parallel lives

CLSC book ‘The Other Wes Moore’ gives glimpses into parallel lives

The Other Wes Moore is the story of two men with the same name. Their tales are similar: raised by a single mother, hung out in tough crowds on the streets of Baltimore, got in trouble with the police.

“The chilling truth is that his story could have been mine,” Moore said in the introduction to The Other Wes Moore. “The tragedy is that my story could have been his. … It’s unsettling to know how little separates each of us from another life altogether.”

Moore will discuss The Other Wes Moore at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy. This is his first visit to Chautauqua.

2012 CLSC book choices showcase unique characters

2012 CLSC book choices showcase unique characters

The 2012 Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle books follow two themes: the weekly morning lecture platform and their own season-long “characters.”

“We try very hard to have a group of books that reflect different genres, and a variety of authors, and to offer books that Chautauquans can connect to the weekly theme,” said Sherra Babcock, director of the Department of Education. “In addition, this year’s ‘vertical theme,’ connecting all the books, is ‘characters,’ reflecting writing with strong character development.”