Posts Tagged 'Supreme Court.'

Jeffries: ‘Our gravest problem is how we treat the guilty’

Jeffries: ‘Our gravest problem is how we treat the guilty’

As an academic who studies the U.S. criminal justice system, John C. Jeffries warned Tuesday’s Amphitheater audience that his lecture wouldn’t be a happy one. But after three decades of examination, he believes the end to what he calls the “incarceration epidemic” is finally in sight.

Jeffries, the David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, gave the second morning lecture on Week Six’s theme, “Crime and Punishment.”

Justice Kennedy: ‘We must know our heritage and our history’

Justice Kennedy: ‘We must know our heritage and our history’

In the eyes of Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Americans take their freedom for granted. As he spoke to the Chautauquans packed in and around the Hall of Philosophy at 3:30 p.m. Monday, he drew upon history and tradition to illustrate how vital it is that Americans engage in the discussion of freedom.
He admitted that in his younger years, he thought democracy could be given like a gift. He joked that some people think they can introduce democracy to a country, wipe their hands and say goodbye, and then democracy will be magically “installed.”

Potter: Rising election costs have corrupting effect on elected officials

Potter: Rising election costs have corrupting effect on elected officials

The 2012 election was one of many firsts. It was the first presidential election in which corporations had First Amendment rights. It was the first federal election with hundreds of millions of dollars of “secret money” spent. And it was the first election since 1972 in which neither presidential candidate participated in the public spending system.
What was the result of this election of firsts? An unprecedented amount of campaign spending: $7 billion.

“That is a 337 percent increase in spending since 1992,” said Trevor Potter, the founder of the Campaign Legal Center in Washington, D.C.

Potter to detail power of money in political processes

Potter to detail power of money in political processes

The issue of campaign financing lies at the intersection of money and politics, of morality and economics, and Trevor Potter thinks it’s time for a change.

At today’s morning lecture at 10:45 a.m. in the Amphitheater, Potter will show Chautauquans how the current system of campaign finance came to be. He is the founding president and general counsel of the Campaign Legal Center, a nonpartisan “watchdog” in campaign finance, elections, political communication and government ethics.

Morning Lecture guest column: In most recent Supreme Court term, links to the past

Morning Lecture guest column: In most recent Supreme Court term, links to the past

It is an article of faith that knowing the past can help explain aspects of the present. What are the origins of some of the most intractable problems we face as a country? What are the underpinnings of our strengths? The end of this year’s Supreme Court term brought two cases — Shelby County v. Holder and Fisher v. the University of Texas — that vividly illustrate the connections between the past and the present.

Former solicitor general Fried to survey recent Supreme Court terms

Former solicitor general Fried to survey recent Supreme Court terms

Week Three’s Interfaith Lectures theme — “Emancipation: Where Do We Go From Here?” — goes hand in hand with the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent rulings on the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8. There’s no better time to bring to Chautauqua Institution a Supreme Court expert who can shed light on the complex machinations of the Supreme Court and the motivations of its justices.