Posts Tagged 'Strohl Art Center'

Former art school student Scoon to discuss new book

Former art school student Scoon to discuss new book

Amber Scoon was a student at Chautauqua Institution’s School of Art in 1999. She returns to Chautauqua to discuss her first book, which came out in May. Scoon dedicated the book to Don Kimes, artistic director of Visual Arts at Chautauqua Institution, for introducing her to the world of contemporary art and to art as an academic study. She also studied with Kimes while earning her master’s at American University.

Modern ‘Abstraction’: VACI finishes three-year series with examples from past two decades

Modern ‘Abstraction’: VACI finishes three-year series with examples from past two decades

The “Abstraction in America” exhibition series is Don Kimes’ baby.

Kimes, artistic director of Visual Arts at Chautauqua Institution, started a relationship two years ago with the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y. Kimes, an abstract painter himself, worked with the gallery to bring a trilogy of shows illustrating America’s history of abstract art to the Institution, one show each season for three years in a row.

In ‘American JuJu,’ Strohl displays power figures that reckon with liberty, value, humanity

In ‘American JuJu,’ Strohl displays power figures that reckon with liberty, value, humanity

Vanessa German’s sculptures have the power to fly, to sing, to heal ailments, to call deeply upon history, to spark curiosity and to bind us together in our humanity. Her mixed-media found-object compositions have their roots in her endlessly creative life as a poet, photographer, actress, designer, educator and sculptor.

Her solo exhibit, “American JuJu: Root and Power for a New Century,” opens today from 3–5 p.m. in the Strohl Art Center’s Bellowe Family Gallery, with German performing several of her spellbinding spoken-word poems at the reception.

“I grew up in an environment where there were always the ingredients for making something else,” said German, the daughter of a fiber artist who encouraged her children to create, to read and to perform. “There was never a time in my life that I don’t remember making things and being a performer. That’s how I knew myself; that’s how I understood who I was.”