Posts Tagged 'science'

Wiseman: Learning about The cosmos  ‘gives us new way of looking at ourselves’

Wiseman: Learning about The cosmos ‘gives us new way of looking at ourselves’

There are those who think that science and religion cannot coexist. Jennifer Wiseman has set out to prove that they can.

Wiseman, the director of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Dialogue on Science, Ethics and Religion told Friday morning’s Amphitheater audience that the marvels of space exploration do not necessarily disprove the existence of a higher power.

“The heavens have inspired humanity, as long as we have been recording history,” Wiseman said. “People have wondered, ‘Why do we have a sense of right and wrong? Where does that come from? What is our purpose? How should we live our lives?’ ”

Hindu, Buddhist, Jain scholars offer Responses to ‘Journey of the Universe’

Hindu, Buddhist, Jain scholars offer Responses to ‘Journey of the Universe’

At Thursday’s Interfaith Lecture, three scholars representing the Eastern religions of Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism gave their responses to the film “Journey of the Universe.” The film sought to integrate modern science with the wisdom traditions of the world to inspire people to have a new and sustainable relationship with the earth.
The three scholars were David Haberman, representing Hinduism; Christopher Ives, Buddhism; and Christopher Chapple, Jainism.

Wiseman discusses emergence of life, its significance

Wiseman discusses emergence of life, its significance

Jennifer Wiseman is an astronomer who does not cease to be in awe of the cosmos.

At 10:45 a.m. today in the Amphitheater, Wiseman will lecture on the most recent astronomical findings of how the universe and its galaxies have matured over time, eventually making life possible on at least one planet. Then she will ask — just as many other lecturers have in the past week — what is humankind’s significance within this vast and elegant universe?

Tucker: Rethink our responsibility to each other, all life

Tucker: Rethink our responsibility to each other, all life

Origin stories are powerful: They can define humanity’s place and responsibilities in the universe. Thus, they play a role in the shape humanity’s future will take.

Mary Evelyn Tucker delivered Monday’s Interfaith Lecture, reflecting on the theme “Journey of the Universe” by positing that we need a new story, one that integrates science and religion and calls to attention the creativity and interdependence of all life on Earth.

Tucker is co-creator of the film “Journey of the Universe” and co-author of the book by the same name.

To believe or not to believe: Schmitz discusses Chautauqua and atheism

To believe or not to believe: Schmitz discusses Chautauqua and atheism

To believe. To have faith. It can be difficult.

H.L. Mencken said “Faith may be defined briefly as an illogical belief in the occurrence of the improbable.”

St. Francis of Assisi said, “Where there is hatred let me sow love. Where there is injury, pardon. Where there is doubt, faith.”

So much for the gray area: Now consider atheists.

To put a historical perspective on the enigma of belief, Jon Schmitz, archivist and historian for Chautauqua, will present “Atheism at Chautauqua” at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ.

Dyson: 1940s scientific revolutions see wide range of results

Dyson: 1940s scientific revolutions see wide range of results

Radicalism in science is essential to move forward. In the span of two years, four scientific revolutions proved that to be true.

Those four revolutions were in space, nuclear energy, genomics and computing.

“Scientific discoveries come from people thinking thoughts that have never been thought before or people using experimental tools that have not been used before,” said theoretical physicist Freeman Dyson at Wednesday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater.

Dyson, professor emeritus at the Institute of Advanced Study, shared his experience living through the four radical revolutions that occurred from 1944 to 1945 as the third speaker of Week Eight, themed “Radicalism.”

Dyson: Without failures, there can be no revolutions

Dyson: Without failures, there can be no revolutions

I am not a radical, but I lived through radical changes. Radical changes are exciting for the old and intoxicating for the young. I was lucky to be in Washington in the summer of 1963 when a quarter of a million black Americans marched for freedom and justice. I marched with them to the Lincoln Memorial and heard Martin Luther King uplifting them with his “I Have a Dream” speech, talking like an Old Testament prophet.

Also uplifting them were groups of young marchers carrying banners saying where they came from. The marchers from the really tough places — Birmingham, Ala., and Albany, Ga. — where the battles for civil rights had been raging, were very young, hardly more than children. In the toughest places, people with family responsibilities could not afford to take chances. From those places, only young people came. Most of them had never been away from their homes before. They had been fighting lonely battles. They had never known that they had so many friends. They looked like the hope of the future as they danced and sang their freedom songs with bright faces and sparkling eyes.