Posts Tagged 'Q&A'

Moore: ‘We have no idea what type of jewels are sitting inside our juvenile justice system’

Moore: ‘We have no idea what type of jewels are sitting inside our juvenile justice system’

They came of age in the same neighborhood of the same city, both spent time in the juvenile criminal justice system, both had behavioral problems. They were both fatherless. But the two young men named Wes Moore would ultimately follow completely different paths — one became a Rhodes Scholar, a White House fellow and a decorated veteran. The other would spend life in prison for murder.

Wes Moore discovered his own name in a headline in The Baltimore Sun, referring to a suspect in a jewelry store murder. After the suspect was convicted, Moore wrote him a letter, asking the man why he committed the crime. What followed were many more letters, which turned into prison visits, which formed the basis of Moore’s book, The Other Wes Moore.

Murray: ‘A life well lived has transcendent value’

Murray: ‘A life well lived has transcendent value’

When talking about “The Pursuit of Happiness,” it becomes impossible to ignore the differences in happiness from one group of Americans to the next.
In Tuesday and Wednesday’s morning lectures, Robert Putnam and Charles Murray both argued that these differences depend on what social class a person is born into. Their solutions, however, are radically different.

Putnam: ‘Strongest predictors of happiness are social relationships’

Putnam: ‘Strongest predictors of happiness are social relationships’

A marriage can cause an increase in happiness equal to a quadrupling salary. Making a good friend is equal to tripling a salary. Belonging to a club can cause an increase in happiness equivalent to doubling a salary. And going on picnics three times a year is the same as receiving a 10 percent raise.
“By now, the strongest predictors of happiness by far are our social relationships,” said Robert Putnam, professor of public policy at Harvard University. “Money alone can buy you happiness, but not much.”

Packer: Inequality creating ‘Unwinding’ of America

Packer: Inequality creating ‘Unwinding’ of America

“The Iraq War was bad for just about everyone, except private contractors.”

George Packer’s summary of the war on terror, concluded from years of research in the Middle East, set the scene for his Thursday morning lecture in the Amphitheater. Packer, a writer at The New Yorker and author of the bestselling book The Unwinding, spoke about America’s failure to fight a war and win. He said the same systemic failure of institutions caused the failure of the war, resulting in Americans suffering under a “broken contract.”

Brooks: Development of internal morals is crucial for today’s youth

Brooks: Development of internal morals is crucial for today’s youth

When David Brooks asked his students at Yale University about the last time they had read a book that changed their lives, they stared at him in complete silence.
“You’ve got to understand that we don’t really read that way,” Brooks’ students told him. “We read to get through the class, but the deep, penetrative reading, we just don’t have time for.”

Harris-Perry: Remnants of Civil War era still inform U.S. politics today

Harris-Perry: Remnants of Civil War era still inform U.S. politics today

Author, professor and columnist Melissa Harris-Perry said there is much Americans can learn from history.

“History is, in many ways, the collective project of making meaning out of the events of the past,” Harris-Perry said. “But history is also much more than an academic exercise.”

Her lecture focused on what current generations can glean from history and how historical events, specifically attitudes in the decades surrounding the Civil War, still have relevance in today’s socio-political world.

Howe: Revolutions in communication, transportation deepen North-South division

Howe: Revolutions in communication, transportation deepen North-South division

There are many ways to look at and study the Civil War and the events leading up to it, but Daniel Walker Howe offered a new way of looking at the crisis of secession at his 10:45 a.m. lecture Thursday.

In his lecture, “The Secession Crisis,” Howe put the Civil War into the context of the dramatic revolution occurring a generation prior to the war in the way of communication and transportation.

In the years between the War of 1812 and secession, the world was reshaped, Howe said.