Posts Tagged 'Patriotism'

Jacobsen brings Americana to Tallman concert

Jacobsen brings Americana to Tallman concert

Shortly before coming to work at Chautauqua Institution in 1996, Jared Jacobsen made a stop at a tiny parish church in London around July 4 to play a recently restored 16th-century pipe organ. He performed “Variations on ‘America,’ ” by Charles Ives, and “the aisles went crazy.”

Patriotism!: More than a flag, more than a pin on a lapel

Patriotism!: More than a flag, more than a pin on a lapel

On April 6, 1917, the United States Congress responded to President Woodrow Wilson’s request and officially declared the country in a state of war. Many people had expected it. Two and a half years earlier, Europe erupted in battle, but the U.S. kept itself neutral. German maritime transgressions, a sense of U.S. responsibility to freedom and democracy, and finally a sense of the country’s vulnerability, led Wilson to make his request. Chautauqua Institution followed.

The 1917 Season would be Chautauqua’s 44th Assembly. As the June 29 edition of The Chautauquan Daily said, it would be a “War-time Chautauqua.”

Ida Tarbell, a former Chautauquan Daily writer and editor, and later muckracker and activist against corporate monopoly, spoke two times that summer, once about “Doing Our Bit” and a second about “Fear of Efficiency.” The Daily reported that the “Famous writer believes that people of the country are doing well in preparation for the coming struggle.”

In the Interest of Mankind: A 1916 epideictic speech from George E. Vincent, a Chautauqua native-son

In the Interest of Mankind: A 1916 epideictic speech from George E. Vincent, a Chautauqua native-son

Chautauqua Institution native-son George E. Vincent, eschewing the beard his father, John Heyl Vincent, wore, possessed a dimpled chin and dark, kind eyes. He was given the college education his father had missed.

In his book Chautauqua: A Center for Education, Religion, and the Arts in America, Theodore Morrison wrote that the young Vincent’s “leadership at Chautauqua was a true filial succession, yet it seems clear that the son belonged to a later generation than the father in mores and beliefs as well as chronology.”

Local and national perspectives on the War of 1812: the birth of patriotism

Local and national perspectives on the War of 1812: the birth of patriotism

The War of 1812 is a sometimes overlooked but nonetheless important conflict in the United States’ coalescence and national identity. As that war contributed to the country, so did Chautauqua County contribute to that war. To explain some of the local, Chautauqua County connection to the War of 1812, and to situate it within the scheme of the whole war, the Oliver Archives Heritage Lecture Series will sponsor Traci Langworthy, assistant professor of history at Jamestown Community College, today at 3:30 p.m. in the Hall of Christ. She will lecture on “In the Shadows of War: Chautauqua Region and the War of 1812.”

Langworthy has been at Jamestown Community College full time since 2004, where she has taught U.S. and world history. She also has developed a course in local history that explores some of the area’s contributions to U.S. history.