Posts Tagged 'Ori Soltes'

Soltes weaves tale of Jews’ history in Turkey

Soltes weaves tale of Jews’ history in Turkey

For his Interfaith Lecture at 2 p.m. Thursday in the Hall of Philosophy, Ori Soltes took the audience on a journey through the history of Jews in Turkey. Soltes teaches theology, philosophy and art history at Georgetown University. For seven years, he was the director and chief curator of the B’nai B’rith Klutznick National Jewish Museum in Washington, D.C.

Emperor Justinian I was the first in the history of the Byzantine Empire to make decrees specifically related to Jews, Soltes said. One of the decrees, for example, required that any synagogue that was needed as a church should be converted to one.

Soltes to explain Gülen movement, Judaism in Turkey

Soltes to explain Gülen movement, Judaism in Turkey

Some of the earliest remains of Jewish synagogues in Turkey date back to the second century, but many more Jews migrated to the area in 1492 after being exiled from Spain. They brought knowledge of the printing press, the trading network and gunpowder that helped to transform the Ottoman Empire into a dominant global power.

Ori Soltes’ Interfaith Lecture at 2 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy will focus on how Jews fit into the climate of modern Turkey. Soltes teaches theology, philosophy and art history at Georgetown University. He was director and chief curator of the B’nai B’rith Klutznick National Jewish Museum in Washington, D.C., for seven years and has lectured at dozens of other museums.

Soltes to paint the complicated backdrop against which Turkish current events are set

Soltes to paint the complicated backdrop against which Turkish current events are set

About five years ago, Ori Soltes and one of his colleagues were lecturing on Shariah at a conference of approximately 200 federal judges and attorneys. During the Q-and-A portion of the presentation, Soltes claimed that Turkey was “positioned to [connect] the East and the West,” and that Turkey now had an opportunity to “re-engage the Arab world, which had been largely hostile to the country for a long time.”

Soltes links art, religion and politics in ‘eternal triangle’

Soltes links art, religion and politics in ‘eternal triangle’

“What walks on four legs in the morning, two legs in the afternoon and three legs in the evening?”

If the average Chautauquan didn’t know the answer to this riddle, he would have been punished by the plague in Sophocles’ play “Oedipus the King.” What he also probably didn’t know was that this riddle highlights an “eternal triangle” of art, religion and politics.