Posts Tagged 'Mary Evelyn Tucker'

Daoist, ethicist, Confucian views close week examining ‘Journey’

Daoist, ethicist, Confucian views close week examining ‘Journey’

Week One’s Interfaith Lecture Series on the documentary film “Journey of the Universe” concluded Friday with lectures by James Miller, a scholar of Daoism; Lisa Sideris, an environmental ethicist; and Mary Evelyn Tucker, a co-producer of the film and a scholar of Confucianism.
James Miller

“I’d like you to think of this story of cosmic evolution not so much as a linear narrative … but as a kind of pattern that keeps on repeating itself,” said James Miller, associate professor of religious studies at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario.

Three more views round out week exploring ‘Journey’

Three more views round out week exploring ‘Journey’

The Chinese symbol xin, pronounced “sheen,” has two definitions: heart and mind.

“Isn’t that concept incredible?” Mary Evelyn Tucker asked in Monday’s Interfaith Lecture.

According to the teachings of Confucianism, the synthesis of heart and mind, or of feelings and rationale, need not be viewed as separate entities. Rather, what feels right in the heart should affect what is in the mind — a humanitarian principle that should inform one’s perspective of the universe.

Tucker will speak at 2 p.m. today in the Amphitheater on how the teachings of Chinese philosopher Confucius are related to the universe. The program will also feature lecturers discussing Daosim and environmental ethics.

Grim: Indigenous ‘lifeways’ can inform modern understanding of the universe

Grim: Indigenous ‘lifeways’ can inform modern understanding of the universe

John Grim’s Tuesday Interfaith Lecture brought the cosmological stories of indigenous peoples into a dialogue with “Journey of the Universe,” a documentary film dedicated to revealing the intimate interdependence and creativity of the universe.

A senior research scholar at Yale University, Grim co-produced “The Journey of the Universe” alongside his wife and colleague Mary Evelyn Tucker, who spoke about the film at Monday’s Interfaith Lecture. Grim has studied a variety of Native American cultures, especially how they conceptualize their relationships with the land and the cosmos.

Tucker: Rethink our responsibility to each other, all life

Tucker: Rethink our responsibility to each other, all life

Origin stories are powerful: They can define humanity’s place and responsibilities in the universe. Thus, they play a role in the shape humanity’s future will take.

Mary Evelyn Tucker delivered Monday’s Interfaith Lecture, reflecting on the theme “Journey of the Universe” by positing that we need a new story, one that integrates science and religion and calls to attention the creativity and interdependence of all life on Earth.

Tucker is co-creator of the film “Journey of the Universe” and co-author of the book by the same name.

Grim seeks understanding through indigenous traditions

Grim seeks understanding through indigenous traditions

Pueblo peoples in the Southwest tell a story that humankind ascended from “the opening,” a small indentation leading underground. A deity suggested to the emerging humans that embracing agriculture would help them return to their ancestors after death.

This story is one of John Grim’s favorites. The Yale University senior lecturer and senior research scholar finds the perspective interesting, as it delves into native peoples’ relationships with the universe.

Tucker speaks on her ‘Journey’ through book, film

Tucker speaks on her ‘Journey’ through book, film

The universe is not simply a place but a story.

Mary Evelyn Tucker wants to share this concept. She’s a senior lecturer and research scholar at Yale University who spent 10 years devoted to that story alongside evolutionary philosopher Brian Swimme.

“Journey of the Universe” is the result. Through a book and Emmy Award-winning film, “Journey” explores the complex role humankind has assumed in shaping the future. Each chapter illustrates the grandest ideas of the universe’s expansion to the humblest beginnings of single cells.