Posts Tagged 'Maggie Livingstone'

Fink caps final week with lecture on medical ethics after natural disasters

Fink caps final week with lecture on medical ethics after natural disasters

Hurricanes in the Northeast, tornadoes in the deep South and earthquakes in California are among the recent natural disasters that have caused millions of dollars in damage and affected countless lives. Dr. Sheri Fink has reported on such catastrophes and has provided insights on how American hospitals prepare and administer help for these disasters.

Fink is the author of the upcoming release Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital, an account of New Orleans’s Memorial Medical Center in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina — more specifically, the medical ethics displayed in the wake of the disaster. She will discuss her book at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Hall of Philosophy, the final lecture of the season in the Chautauqua Women’s Club Contemporary Issues Forum speaker series.

Athenaeum Hotel to continue updates while balancing tradition, Stanton says

Athenaeum Hotel to continue updates while balancing tradition, Stanton says

For more than 130 years, the Athenaeum Hotel has been a model of elegant tradition and service for Chautauqua Institution. Rooted in rich history and boasting an impressive roster of visitors throughout the decades, the success of the Athenaeum is like a mirror to that of the Institution; they depend on one another. Though traditions have made the Athenaeum what it is today, General Manager Bruce Stanton feels the hotel must let go of some of these older practices in order to maintain a standard of excellence.

Drink it in: Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre makes Chautauqua debut with three different ballet styles

Drink it in: Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre makes Chautauqua debut with three different ballet styles

At 8:15 p.m. tonight, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre will end its summer season with three distinct pieces on the Amphitheater stage. This is the company’s first time performing at Chautauqua Institution.

Though the three works the company is performing tonight are not new, combining the three in the same show provides an innovative and eclectic mix of ballet; each dance is drastically different in period and style from the others.

‘Harvard Business Review’ editor Green to discuss new gender roles in business

‘Harvard Business Review’ editor Green to discuss new gender roles in business

When Sarah Green graduated from college, she worked as a sports columnist for Boston Metro. She initially thought that there was no relation between baseball and business, but later discovered that the real sports news came in the form of trade transactions, general manager activities and multimillion-dollar deals. Reporting from the diamond was secondary to watching the business that was taking place behind the scenes.

Harmony Parade brings golden age of barbershop to Amp for 65th year

Harmony Parade brings golden age of barbershop to Amp for 65th year

Western New York has a rich history in barbershop music, starting with one of the most famous American shop groups, the Buffalo Bills. The quartet, formed in 1947, found professional success and was the Barbershop Harmony Society’s 1950 International Quartet champion. Though modern barbershop quartets and choruses have decreased in popularity, the art form is still very much alive. Today, the Barbershop Harmony Society has 17 different districts across the country, upholding the longstanding tradition of the live music and soaring spirit associated with the golden age of barbershop.

Immigration correspondent Preston explores politics behind potential reform

Immigration correspondent Preston explores politics behind potential reform

In June 2013, for the first time since 1986, the U.S. Senate passed a bill that would reform nationwide immigration laws. The bill is expected to be debated on the floor of the House of Representatives this fall. If it’s passed, it will overhaul the modern immigration system, potentially legalizing undocumented immigrants currently living in the U.S. The immigration debate and potential consequences of this bill’s passage will be of paramount importance in the coming months for Julia Preston, the national immigration correspondent for The New York Times.

Preston will make her Chautauqua debut at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Hall of Philosophy in a talk on the politics behind immigration reform and the evolving concept of American nationality. Her talk is the penultimate lecture in this season’s Contemporary Issues Forum, a Saturday speaker series sponsored by the Chautauqua Women’s Club.

CMO Murphy to speak about Institution marketing initiatives

CMO Murphy to speak about Institution marketing initiatives

George Murphy was a Chautauquan of 20 years when he was named the Institution’s first vice president and chief marketing officer in 2010, but he learned quickly that the view of the grounds — and what goes into the making of a season at Chautauqua — is quite different from inside the Colonnade.

Murphy will speak about new Chautauqua branding and marketing initiatives at 9:15 a.m. Thursday at the Women’s Clubhouse. The event is part of the Chautauqua Women’s Club Chautauqua Speaks lecture series.

Quart to discuss people ‘living at the margins’ for Women’s Club

Quart to discuss people ‘living at the margins’ for Women’s Club

A lifelong Manhannite, Alissa Quart has been exposed to what she calls a “countercultural” way of thinking. A spirit of alternative method and expression was ingrained in her community and in her family, her parents being “1960s types” rooted in the East Village of New York City. But the recent gentrification of the city has brought along a discouragement of self-expression and a wealthy veneer to a place that once highly idealized individualism, Quart said. This rebellious spirit is something she is looking to bring back, and not just to her hometown.

Women’s advocate Wilson to speak on leadership gap

Women’s advocate Wilson to speak on leadership gap

At the end of Eleanor Roosevelt’s life, she is said to have asked her doctor if anything she had done had mattered. Even a first lady, a woman whose accomplishments were numerous, needed validation. Marie Wilson points to this moment as an example of women demeaning themselves, a small piece of a gender gap in leadership that Wilson is fighting to reduce.

Wilson, a longtime women’s leadership advocate, author and professional, will speak at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Hall of Philosophy. Her lecture, titled “Closing the Leadership Gap,” is part of the Contemporary Issues Forum, a speaker series sponsored by the Chautauqua Women’s Club.