Posts Tagged 'lauren rock'

‘White Flags’ installation illustrates common cloth

‘White Flags’ installation illustrates common cloth

After Sept. 11, Aaron Fein watched as cars sported American flag bumper stickers and patriotism swelled in response to the tragedy. During the next 10 years, he watched their colors slowly fade under the influence of time and nature.

“Everybody puts up a flag thinking that it’s a symbol that doesn’t ever change,” Fein said last Friday, standing on Bestor Plaza under a structure that resembled a rotary airer hanging out eight large white sheets.

The project, “White Flags,” contains 193 flags, one for every member of the United Nations. Sewing each together, and using a digital embroidery machine for the complicated flags, took him almost 10 years. He turns the Portugal flag into the sun so the intricate embroidery catches the light to show two young girls who have entered under his umbrella-like structure.

Butler climbs from New Clergy to guest chaplain

Butler climbs from New Clergy to guest chaplain

The Rev. Don Darius Butler came to Chautauqua for the first time in July when he was part of the New Clergy Program. He came back for the second time just four weeks later to preach for two days at the Morning Devotional Service. This is not a usual occurrence for participants of the New Clergy Program but reflects the high quality of the 12 to 15 people chosen to attend.

Those pastors and rabbis chosen to attend the New Clergy Program are in their fifth to seventh year of ministry, a time when many clergy choose to leave the profession. The New Clergy Program at Chautauqua and similar denominational programs provide nurture and pastoral development at a crucial time. A second group will be at Chautauqua during Week Eight.

For lifeguards, no news is good news

For lifeguards, no news is good news

In the dazzling sunlight, she surveyed the scene before her. Kids were everywhere. Mothers were nearby, as were some dads and a couple of dogs. Bicycles overflowed the racks and spilled out along the road. Underscoring the happy cacophony on the beach and in the water was the steady chatter of cellphone conversations. It was a summer afternoon at Children’s Beach.

Dark hair framing her deeply tanned face, head beach lifeguard Melissa Long was satisfied.

“Contrary to what some people say, lifeguarding isn’t boring,” she said. “Most of the time, there are lots of people to watch, and we’re trained to stay attentive and alert.”

Volunteers help visitors find their way

Volunteers help visitors find their way

The Chautauqua Volunteers are the Institution’s welcoming army. They are a merry band of 40 or so Chautauquans who want to share Chautauqua’s community spirit with visitors. Their uniform includes a green apron with pockets jammed with schedules, maps, brochures and a visor with a green-printed “CHQ.” Their mission is graciousness and helpfulness to visitors. Or, as volunteer organizer Bob Reeder said, “We are a human GPS.”

The accuracy of that definition is apparent as a group of volunteers gathered at Logan Hall rattled off the questions they routinely answer as they work the entrance Saturday or in other venues when needed.

Sullivan: Honor code, communication cultivates culture of honor, integrity

Sullivan: Honor code, communication cultivates culture of honor, integrity

Honor codes within the education system can instill a long-lasting culture of honor and integrity.

Teresa A. Sullivan, president of the University of Virginia, framed Friday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater around how communities can maintain a culture of those traits to end Week Seven, themed “The Ethics of Cheating.”

The millennial generation, which includes anyone born since 1980, can be characterized by several key traits, Sullivan said. Those individuals are more confident, more team- and peer-oriented, more inclined to rely on peers for reinforcement and approval, face increased pressure to succeed, and focused on the future and long-term career success.

Butler: ‘In Jesus, the worship of God is uncompromised’

Butler: ‘In Jesus, the worship of God is uncompromised’

“These We Have in Common” was the title of the Rev. Don Darius Butler’s sermon for the 9:15 a.m. Thursday Devotional Hour. His text was Matthew 4:1-11.

“This narrative is usually tucked away in Lent, when the faithful face their own humanity and their common problems,” Butler said. “But Jesus struggled against the forces of the world, and no one has ever been this vulnerable, no one has had a one-on-one encounter with the Devil, no one has faced the test so directly.”

Yet we have much in common with Jesus in what we face in our everyday lives. The three temptations Jesus faced shaped his character, his identity and his ministry. The first temptation, to turn stones into bread, is the temptation to misuse our power, Butler said.

Adversity in ‘As You Like It’ connects to 1930s and now

Adversity in ‘As You Like It’ connects to 1930s and now

Dressed in 1930s garb over their daily outfits, the cast members of William Shakespeare’s As You Like It work on two pages of text for one hour during an early blocking rehearsal. Each line of dialogue is a discussion, and each movement on the stage takes repetition to perfect.

Presiding over the rehearsal process is director Jackson Gay, who, through conversations with the actors, designers and production staff, brings As You Like It to life. The third and final Chautauqua Theater Company full production previews at 8 p.m. Friday and opens at 6 p.m. Saturday in Bratton Theater.

The show runs through Aug. 17, and behind-the-scenes details will be shared at 12:15 p.m. today in Bratton Theater at the weekly CTC Brown Bag discussion.

Heiman, McHugh present contrasting perspectives on infidelity

Heiman, McHugh present contrasting perspectives on infidelity

Julia Heiman thinks affairs are driven by the stories people tell themselves to justify their actions. Paul McHugh thinks people are confused about sex.

Heiman and McHugh individually spoke about their views on extramarital affairs before having a conversation with each other during Tuesday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater for Week Seven, themed “The Ethics of Cheating.”

Bemporad: Religion must reclaim sense of the holy, speak for the future

Bemporad: Religion must reclaim sense of the holy, speak for the future

“I do not think that one can claim that human beings are by nature either wholly good or wholly evil. We have the potential for both. We can either be good, or we can be not so good, and the culture and education that we’re exposed to can elicit one or the other,” Rabbi Jack Bemporad said Monday in the Hall of Philosophy.

In the first Interfaith Lecture on the Week Seven theme, “Creating Cultures of Honor and Integrity,” Bemporad discussed whether there are universal standards that define acceptable behavior for societies and individuals, what standards are “healthfully human,” how those standards can be emphasized, and the role of religion in encouraging those standards. The title of his lecture was “The Challenge of Creating Cultures of Honor and Integrity.”