Posts Tagged 'Kelly Tunney'

Burns: ‘We need to lead with diplomacy, not the military’

Burns: ‘We need to lead with diplomacy, not the military’

Drug cartels, sex trafficking, global terrorism, nuclear proliferation and climate change have at least one thing in common — Nicholas Burns believes diplomacy could fix them all.

Burns, the first speaker on the Week Seven theme of “Diplomacy,” is a former American diplomat, having served as the American ambassador to Greece and as a representative to NATO. Currently, he works as a professor of international politics and the practice of diplomacy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Open dialogue: MSFO, Voice Program team up for Poulenc’s recitative ‘Carmelites’

Open dialogue: MSFO, Voice Program team up for Poulenc’s recitative ‘Carmelites’

Just days before the Reign of Terror ended in 1794, and after the French government had instilled the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, a group of nuns from the Carmelite Order of Compiègne refused to leave their monastery. For this act, they were sentenced to death. These events are the basis for Francis Poulenc’s Dialogues of the Carmelites.

Students from the School of Music’s Voice Program, under the direction of faculty member John Giampietro, will take the Amphitheater stage at 8:15 p.m. tonight to perform Poulenc’s opera, with 16 students portraying the nuns. The Music School Festival Orchestra will provide accompaniment, conducted by Timothy Muffitt, MSFO music director.

Israelievitch, Matsumoto take on Brahms’ works in marathon recital

Israelievitch, Matsumoto take on Brahms’ works in marathon recital

When asked why he wanted to climb Mount Everest, George Mallory, the English mountaineer who was among the first to attempt the climb, replied, “Because it’s there.” Jacques Israelievitch, faculty member in the School of Music’s Instrumental Program, cited the same reasoning for deciding to perform a marathon concert of Johannes Brahms’ viola and violin works.

Retired judge Gertner to speak about mass incarceration

Retired judge Gertner to speak about mass incarceration

Nancy Gertner believes mass incarceration has been a failure of the American justice system. Having worked in it for most of her life, she has seen firsthand the injustice imposed upon prisoners by harsh sentencing.

Gertner will speak at today’s 10:45 a.m. morning lecture in the Amphitheater about a system that incarcerates more people for longer periods of time than any other Western country.

Competition champion Zhu showcases a summer of learning in winner’s recital

Competition champion Zhu showcases a summer of learning in winner’s recital

Alvin Zhu sat on a metal bench outside Fletcher Music Hall on Friday, July 26, having just finished performing for the hall’s large crowd. He was calm in his black suit and his voice did not waver. Despite his youth, the winner of the School of Music’s 2013 Annual Piano Competition clearly exhibits professionalism in his manner and a high level of piano playing in his performance.

Moore to share impact of decisions with Young Readers

Moore to share impact of decisions with Young Readers

Two boys named Wes Moore grew up to have two very different fates: one an Army combat veteran, youth advocate, author and TV show host, the other a criminal. The two boys grew up in similar situations but made different choices about where their lives would go.

Wes Moore’s second book, Discovering Wes Moore, takes the author back through the process of finding the man whose name he shared, the man who was convicted of killing a police officer during a theft at a jewelry store. Moore will discuss his book with the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle Young Readers at 4:15 p.m. today in the Alumni Hall Ballroom.

Morrison to share fallability of U.S. justice system

Morrison to share fallability of U.S. justice system

Michael Morton served almost 25 years in prison for the murder of his wife before DNA testing proved his innocence. By the time he was freed in 2011, he had lost contact with his only child, who was 3 years old at the time of the crime. The DNA testing took 10 years to produce — it ended up proving not only his innocence, but also the guilt of the actual murderer.

Nina Morrison was involved in getting Morton out from behind bars. A a senior staff attorney for the Innocence Project, which works with wrongfully convicted people to prove their innocence, Morrison will speak at today’s 10:45 a.m. morning lecture in the Amphitheater about what DNA testing has taught the Innocence Project about the fallibility of America’s criminal justice system.

Jeffries: ‘Our gravest problem is how we treat the guilty’

Jeffries: ‘Our gravest problem is how we treat the guilty’

As an academic who studies the U.S. criminal justice system, John C. Jeffries warned Tuesday’s Amphitheater audience that his lecture wouldn’t be a happy one. But after three decades of examination, he believes the end to what he calls the “incarceration epidemic” is finally in sight.

Jeffries, the David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, gave the second morning lecture on Week Six’s theme, “Crime and Punishment.”