Posts Tagged 'inspire. commit. act.'

Krauss discusses the beauty of science, the universe

Krauss discusses the beauty of science, the universe

“The ideas of science make it so important for humans — it’s part of what makes being human worth being human, the ideas of science,” Lawrence Krauss said.

Friday, Krauss sat down with radio show host and producer Krista Tippett, as the final interview in her weeklong series based around the Week Three theme, “Krista Tippett and Friends who Inspire, Commit, Act.”

“The ideas change our perspective of our place in the cosmos, and to me, that’s what great art, music and literature is all about,” Krauss said. “When you see a play, or see a painting or hear a wonderful piece of music in some sense, it changes your perspective of yourself, and that’s what science does in a profoundly important way and in a way with content that matters.”

Writer-in-residence Rolnick bases Brown Bag lecture on Week Three theme

Writer-in-residence Rolnick bases Brown Bag lecture on Week Three theme

Josh Rolnick, prose writer-in-residence for Week Four, will fuel his experience at the Writers’ Center with what he has learned on the grounds as a Chautauquan.

For his first trip as writer-in-residence, he wanted to center his Brown Bag lecture on the week’s theme, “Inspire. Commit. Act.”

“People really think deeply about a particular theme,” Rolnick said. “I really love it when not just the lecture of the day but some of the other events throughout the day are linked to the theme.”

He will present “The Tug of Stories” at 12:15 p.m. today on the porch at the Literary Arts Center at Alumni Hall to help inspire Chautauquans to write, get them to commit to it and take action by actually doing it.

Celebrated educator Hrabowski to share success in rethinking math, science schooling

Celebrated educator Hrabowski to share success in rethinking math, science schooling

Freeman Hrabowski remembers growing up in Birmingham, Ala., and discovering two major sources of inspiration in his life at about the same time — the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and algebra.

One of the students who marched in the 1963 Children’s Crusade for civil rights, Hrabowski recalls being most inspired by King’s statement that a human has the ability to shape his or her own destiny.

“At the same time, I was learning algebra and beginning to understand how important math was to the education process — what we do in education, quite frankly, and what we do in life,” Hrabowski said.

Hrabowski, a 2012 Time 100 “Most Influential People in the World” honoree, will speak at 10:45 a.m. Friday in the Amphitheater to close the week of lectures themed “Inspire. Commit. Act.”

Jon Gertner: The meaning of innovation, and why we should care

Jon Gertner: The meaning of innovation, and why we should care

Here’s a quick question that seems simple but that I think is a lot harder than it looks: What does the word “innovation” mean? Is it the same as invention? Or is it more similar to discovery? We probably know that innovation has something to do with human creativity and usually with new technology. But can innovation just be explained as any kind of creative new thing or idea? Or is it something altogether different?

These days, on the television news or in the business press, we can’t go long before hearing about new, innovative companies. In fact, it’s become a steady drumbeat. We hear about innovative products and innovative “apps” for our smartphones. Or we hear about fantastically innovative people, like the late Steve Jobs, who have earned themselves the honorific of being called innovators. But it can sometimes be difficult to separate truth from hype. What’s more is there seems little doubt that the term innovation now seems to function much like a buzzword: We hear it so often, and apply it so indiscriminately, that we may have only the haziest sense of its definitions. Meanwhile, as the deeper meanings of innovation have become obscured, I’ve often wondered: Does that mean we have lost a sense of what innovation requires, or why it’s so difficult, or why — when it succeeds — it can be so central to our culture and economy?

Poet-in-residence Maddox to show poetry as ‘confrontation of life’

Poet-in-residence Maddox to show poetry as ‘confrontation of life’

The Writers’ Center brings poet-in-residence Marjorie Maddox to Chautauqua for Week Three, and in turn, she encourages Chautauquans to bring poetry to everybody else.

Maddox will present a Brown Bag lecture, “The Power to Inspire: Bringing Poetry to the People,” at 12:15 p.m. today on the Alumni Hall porch, which coincides with the week’s morning lecture theme, “Inspire. Commit. Act.”

“I’m hoping I can give them some ideas about how to implement this love of poetry and conversation that can stem from it in their own communities,” Maddox said. “I guess that is the link to this idea of inspiring, committing and acting.”

Gertner to examine Bell Labs as model for innovation

Gertner to examine Bell Labs as model for innovation

Jon Gertner grew up across from AT&T’s Bell Labs in New Jersey. Decades later, he would write a book historicizing those same labs that forever changed the face of American technology and life.

That book, The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation, is one thing Gertner will discuss at 10:45 a.m. today in the Amphitheater in his lecture “What it Takes: The Challenge (and Meaning) of True Innovation” as part of Week Three’s theme, “Inspire. Commit. Act.”

The son of a professor and pharmacological scientist, Gertner initially noticed more of the Bell Labs’ mystique than the Nobel Prize-winning research performed inside. It would be years later when his attention returned to the lab, and this time, with a more penetrating eye.

Nunn will challenge audience to take action for positive change

Nunn will challenge audience to take action for positive change

In his inaugural address on Jan. 20, 1989, President George H. W. Bush said, “I have spoken of a thousand points of light, of all the community organizations that are spread like stars throughout the Nation, doing good.

“The old ideas are new again because they are not old, they are timeless: duty, sacrifice, commitment, and a patriotism that finds its expression in taking part and pitching in.”

Michelle Nunn, a passionate activist and president of a young, grassroots volunteer network in Atlanta, was working to uphold the old ideas that the president spoke of. The phrase Bush used to describe organizations like her own resonated with her work.

“The organization that I helped create grew into a national network of volunteer hubs across the country, and five years ago we (HandsOn Network) joined with Points of Light to form the world’s largest nonprofit organization focused on volunteer action,” Nunn, now Points of Light CEO, said in an email interview.

Nunn may be the perfect speaker to kick off this week’s morning lecture theme of “Inspire. Commit. Act.,” since those words also encapsulate the mission of Points of Light — to inspire, equip and mobilize people to take action that changes the world.