Posts Tagged 'innovation'

Corwin: ‘You have to start the discussion with what’s right for the patient’

Corwin: ‘You have to start the discussion with what’s right for the patient’

It was 1968, and Steven J. Corwin’s grandfather was having a heart attack. At 12 years old, Corwin observed the treatment his 62-year-old grandfather was given — recommended bed rest for six weeks and the advice to “curtail“ his smoking. Two weeks later, his grandfather passed away from a second heart attack.

“That was my inspiration to go into cardiology,” said Corwin, CEO at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Corwin spoke at Tuesday’s morning lecture on Week Nine’s theme of “Health Care: Reform and Innovation.” His lecture focused on the progress being made in medicine today, in technology as well as in cost-controlling measures.

Zolli explores impact of our digital selves on the world

Zolli explores impact of our digital selves on the world

With origins in the small town of Camden, Maine, the global innovation network PopTech could be considered a distant cousin of Chautauqua Institution, said Andrew Zolli, the organization’s executive director and curator.

“We bring the world’s creative community to this small town in much the same way that Chautauqua brings some of the world’s best thinkers and leaders to its community,” he said.

Friday morning, Zolli will close Week Six’s lecture platform on “Digital Identity” at 10:45 a.m in the Amphitheater. His lecture will focus on the intersection between our digital selves and real world outcomes.

Hrabowski: US competitiveness at risk without education innovation

Hrabowski: US competitiveness at risk without education innovation

Every generation has been more educated than the one before it since the Higher Education Act of 1965. But that progress is not continuing today.

Freeman Hrabowski, president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, discussed the issues facing science and engineering education in the United States during Friday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater as the last speaker of Week Three, themed “Inspire. Commit. Act.”

The U.S. faces today a deficiency in students graduating from universities and colleges with a degree in science or engineering. Six percent of Americans who hold bachelor’s degrees have them in those subjects, compared with higher percentages in other countries, Hrabowski said.

Gertner: Structures, not formulas, lead to disruptive innovation

Gertner: Structures, not formulas, lead to disruptive innovation

Jon Gertner compares the process of innovation to writing books and making art.

“I think new technologies happen in ways that are very similar to those other expressions — that they arise from very deep, creative impulses,” Gertner said. “They require care, commitment, perseverance.”

Gertner, author of The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation, spoke about concepts of innovation during Tuesday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater for Week Three, themed “Inspire. Commit. Act.”

The word “innovation” was not applied to technology until the 1950s, when those who worked at Bell Labs began to use the term, Gertner said. The word filled the gap between discovery and invention.

Jon Gertner: The meaning of innovation, and why we should care

Jon Gertner: The meaning of innovation, and why we should care

Here’s a quick question that seems simple but that I think is a lot harder than it looks: What does the word “innovation” mean? Is it the same as invention? Or is it more similar to discovery? We probably know that innovation has something to do with human creativity and usually with new technology. But can innovation just be explained as any kind of creative new thing or idea? Or is it something altogether different?

These days, on the television news or in the business press, we can’t go long before hearing about new, innovative companies. In fact, it’s become a steady drumbeat. We hear about innovative products and innovative “apps” for our smartphones. Or we hear about fantastically innovative people, like the late Steve Jobs, who have earned themselves the honorific of being called innovators. But it can sometimes be difficult to separate truth from hype. What’s more is there seems little doubt that the term innovation now seems to function much like a buzzword: We hear it so often, and apply it so indiscriminately, that we may have only the haziest sense of its definitions. Meanwhile, as the deeper meanings of innovation have become obscured, I’ve often wondered: Does that mean we have lost a sense of what innovation requires, or why it’s so difficult, or why — when it succeeds — it can be so central to our culture and economy?

Gertner to examine Bell Labs as model for innovation

Gertner to examine Bell Labs as model for innovation

Jon Gertner grew up across from AT&T’s Bell Labs in New Jersey. Decades later, he would write a book historicizing those same labs that forever changed the face of American technology and life.

That book, The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation, is one thing Gertner will discuss at 10:45 a.m. today in the Amphitheater in his lecture “What it Takes: The Challenge (and Meaning) of True Innovation” as part of Week Three’s theme, “Inspire. Commit. Act.”

The son of a professor and pharmacological scientist, Gertner initially noticed more of the Bell Labs’ mystique than the Nobel Prize-winning research performed inside. It would be years later when his attention returned to the lab, and this time, with a more penetrating eye.