Posts Tagged 'hope'

For Hoti, religion allows understanding of ‘other’

For Hoti, religion allows understanding of ‘other’

Passion for interfaith education runs through Amineh Hoti’s blood. Her grandfather believed a perspective beyond Islam was important from a young age, forcing his grandchildren to participate in a Convent of Jesus and Mary in Pakistan.

Hoti’s father grew up in India before the partition in 1947, where he lived among Hindus, Christians and Muslims coexisting in peace. He has since focused his life on understanding other systems of belief.

Decades later, Hoti follows the same passion. She is the co-founder and director of the Centre for the Study of Muslim-Jewish Relations at the University of Cambridge, which was the first of its kind.

‘Let someone else’s staggering need enter into our lives’

‘Let someone else’s staggering need enter into our lives’

“ ‘Is there a God of real hope and real forgiveness?’ That is the question the world is asking,” said the Rev. Mark Labberton at Thursday’s 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour. His text was Matthew 16:1-20, and his title was “Warnings and Discoveries.” Labberton is serving as the Harold F. Reed Sr. chaplain for Week Three.

Labberton began his sermon with a story about a woman who called for help. “I want to come and see you, but I have provisions I need to have respected. I want to tell my story, but first you need to know that this is the first time I am willing to meet with a man to talk about my life. Second, this conversation must take place in a public place like a park and I am going to scream, yell, swear and smoke,” the woman had said.

From the pulpit: Four windows and a hope

From the pulpit: Four windows and a hope

Window One: A Global Cry

We are at a crossroads, a time of almost unparalleled personal and global turbulence. Nations, institutions and habits are undergoing extraordinary redefinition and realignment. Personal expectations are imploding under the weight of economic loss and confusion. Religions are prominently on the horizon but often seen colliding with one another, adding confusion and disappointment to the scene. Where are we going? Where should we go?

In biblical terms, that is a cry for wisdom. Of course, that is not what most would say or recognize as their hunger. Even many in the Church wouldn’t see or put it that way, because we, too, think what we need is something more pragmatic and realpolitik than we expect wisdom to be.