Posts Tagged 'history'

Wigger: Methodist movement a model for free-market church adaptation

Wigger: Methodist movement a model for free-market church adaptation

The number of regular religious adherents has increased in America since colonial times, in contrast to a steady decrease in Great Britain and the rest of Europe. With that growing number of churchgoers came a decline in colonial churches after the American Revolution — a change John Wigger said set the stage for our present religious culture.

Visual research guides Garand’s sculpture

Visual research guides Garand’s sculpture

On one of sculptor Brenda Garand’s many trips to the province of Quebec, she spent time in Tadoussac, where a merchant and French navy captain acquired a fur trade monopoly. Oral history and the legend of a place interest Garand; she said most of her ideas for her sculptures come from a psychological sense of history and a physical sense of place.

Waugh: Civil War memory wars ‘continue to this day’

Waugh: Civil War memory wars ‘continue to this day’

History and memory have perhaps never been more at odds than over the Civil War. At least, that’s the way Joan Waugh, history professor at University of California, Los Angeles, sees it.

“1863 in History and Memory” was the title of Waugh’s lecture, the last one in the series of the Week Four theme, “America, 1863.” Through her lecture, Waugh sought to explain how memory traditions shape modern interpretations of history.

Gallagher: Gettysburg, Vicksburg are ‘Flashy,’ but clearly not Civil War’s turning points

Gallagher: Gettysburg, Vicksburg are ‘Flashy,’ but clearly not Civil War’s turning points

The BBC, National Geographic, standardized tests, Ken Burns and “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” don’t appear to have much in common. But their common thread is that they’ve all characterized the Battle of Gettysburg as the turning point in the American Civil War. And, according to historian Gary Gallagher, they’re all wrong.

Gallagher, a professor of American history at the University of Virginia, presented Wednesday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater on how human memories of events and the actual events are often conflicting, which may result in painting a picture of historical events that is not completely accurate.