Posts Tagged 'Franklin Delano Roosevelt'

Morning Worship: ‘Wake Up’ to change the world

Morning Worship: ‘Wake Up’ to change the world

“Every year, about Oct. 31, I begin a season of prayer and fasting,” said the Rev. Frank Madison Reid III at the 10:45 a.m. Sunday worship service and sermon in the Amphitheater. “I ask God to show me what the theme for my preaching and teaching for the next year should be. The day after Thanksgiving in 2014, he said that 2015 would be a year of great awakening. So wherever I go, my assignment is to tell you that it is time for a great awakening.”

Burns, Ward show sneak preview of ‘The Roosevelts: An Intimate History’

Burns, Ward show sneak preview of ‘The Roosevelts: An Intimate History’

On Sept. 14, PBS will begin a week of broadcasting Ken Burns and Geoffrey Ward’s upcoming documentary series on Theodore, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, titled “The Roosevelts: An Intimate History.” Broadcast in two-hour-long episodes over seven days, the 14-hour series will cover 104 years of history, beginning with Theodore Roosevelt’s birth in 1858 and ending with Eleanor Roosevelt’s death in 1962.

Patriotism!: More than a flag, more than a pin on a lapel

Patriotism!: More than a flag, more than a pin on a lapel

On April 6, 1917, the United States Congress responded to President Woodrow Wilson’s request and officially declared the country in a state of war. Many people had expected it. Two and a half years earlier, Europe erupted in battle, but the U.S. kept itself neutral. German maritime transgressions, a sense of U.S. responsibility to freedom and democracy, and finally a sense of the country’s vulnerability, led Wilson to make his request. Chautauqua Institution followed.

The 1917 Season would be Chautauqua’s 44th Assembly. As the June 29 edition of The Chautauquan Daily said, it would be a “War-time Chautauqua.”

Ida Tarbell, a former Chautauquan Daily writer and editor, and later muckracker and activist against corporate monopoly, spoke two times that summer, once about “Doing Our Bit” and a second about “Fear of Efficiency.” The Daily reported that the “Famous writer believes that people of the country are doing well in preparation for the coming struggle.”

Lecture to recall historic ‘I Hate War’ speech

Lecture to recall historic ‘I Hate War’ speech

It might be that the name, Mary Frances Bestor Cram, is a mouthful. On the other hand, she had a lot to say. Her father, Arthur Bestor, presided over Chautauqua for some 30 years — through two world wars and the Depression. One remarkable event during those years was Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s visit to Chautauqua in August 1936, when he gave his “I Hate War” speech.