Posts Tagged 'Featured'

Analyst Dentzer to clarify current health policy muddle

Analyst Dentzer to clarify current health policy muddle

Susan Dentzer will wrap up the Week Nine examination of “Health Care: Reform and Innovation” — and the 2013 morning lecture series — at 10:45 a.m. today in the Amphitheater.

Dentzer is a longtime health care analyst on “PBS NewsHour,” former editor of the journal Health Affairs and a senior health policy adviser at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton, N.J.

Cassel: Doctor-patient relationship needs to rest on even ground

Cassel: Doctor-patient relationship needs to rest on even ground

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary lists the first definition of “patient” as “bearing pains or trials calmly or without complaint.” The thesaurus provides some of the expected synonyms: “tolerant” and “stoic.” But then some “related words” take a slightly darker turn — “subservient,” “conformist” and, taking the sentiment to its bleakest extreme, “slavish.”

While there are many times patience is, as they say, a virtue, Dr. Christine K. Cassel said people seeking medical care don’t like calling themselves “patients.” It makes them feel powerless. And that’s a dynamic between consumers and health care providers that Cassel wants to help change; she believes people seeking health care need to have a more balanced doctor-patient relationship than has historically been the case.

Sagar: The key to health care is caring

Sagar: The key to health care is caring

In Dr. Stephen Sagar’s view, medicine has become a dystopian business enterprise. There are so many rules and regulations for health care professionals to deal with that it is becoming increasingly difficult for them to provide compassionate health care. Bureaucratic systems are taking the soul out of health care organizations, he said, by pulling physicians and nurses out of the front lines and into a culture detached from patients, one that values efficiency and productivity over personal interaction. “You may be surprised to learn that physicians are losing their power to make decisions and moral choices,” Sagar said. “A major contributor to that is micromanagement of the physician and nurse by a burgeoning bureaucracy of administrators and managers who impose a top-down approach to controlling clinicians.”

Puchalski advocates spiritual assessment in patient treatment

Puchalski advocates spiritual assessment in patient treatment

Before going to medical school, Christina Puchalski worked at the National Institutes of Health, a medical research agency that typically treats patients who did not respond to conventional treatments. She began to realize that spirituality is important for coping with physical distress; despite their illnesses, many NIH patients had a real sense of purpose because of their faith.

Gilfillan: U.S. must change private marketplace to move to ‘patient-centric’ approach

Gilfillan: U.S. must change private marketplace to move to ‘patient-centric’ approach

Dr. Richard Gilfillan thinks that basically every health professional has walked a career path paved with good intentions. No one who has stepped up to the podium this week in the Amphitheater, the Hall of Philosophy or anywhere else on the grounds hates the idea of making people healthy.

“No one comes here and says they want to provide fragmented health care at an unreasonable cost,” he said.

Fratianne: Physically healing burn victims is not enough

Fratianne: Physically healing burn victims is not enough

Soon after becoming director of the Comprehensive Burn Center at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, Dr. Richard Fratianne met a young woman named Gloria who had been burned from the waist up. A life-threatening injury, her burns covered 60 percent of her body.

Those at the burn center put Gloria through five major surgical procedures, Fratianne said. They rebuilt her face with skin grafts so she could open and close her eyes normally and so she could eat and drink without drooling; though her cheeks were stiff, she could still smile. A job well done, the surgeons thought to themselves.

Sagar to speak on ‘spiritual malaise’ of health systems

Sagar to speak on ‘spiritual malaise’ of health systems

Sickness within the health care system doesn’t stay inside the walls of a patient’s room, said Dr. Stephen Sagar. The entire system is ill, and Sagar believes the cause is a lack of compassion.

Sagar, a radiation oncologist and professor of oncology at Canada’s McMaster University, will speak at 2 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy in an Interfaith Lecture on the spiritual malaise plaguing health care systems.

Weber to join Young Readers discussion on loss, illness in Week Nine selections

Weber to join Young Readers discussion on loss, illness in Week Nine selections

The CLSC Young Readers program for the final week of the season offers two stories of loss and hope. Readers ages 11 and younger have explored 11-year-old Melody’s cerebral palsy in Sharon Draper’s Out of My Mind, while readers 12 and older have learned the story of Hazel Lancaster and her struggle with cancer in John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars.

To further engage readers on the books’ themes, the Young Readers program welcomes Doron Weber, this week’s CLSC author of Immortal Bird: A Family Memoir, at 4:15 p.m. today in the Alumni Hall Ballroom.

Weber will discuss his book and share the experience of losing his son almost eight years ago.

Drink it in: Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre makes Chautauqua debut with three different ballet styles

Drink it in: Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre makes Chautauqua debut with three different ballet styles

At 8:15 p.m. tonight, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre will end its summer season with three distinct pieces on the Amphitheater stage. This is the company’s first time performing at Chautauqua Institution.

Though the three works the company is performing tonight are not new, combining the three in the same show provides an innovative and eclectic mix of ballet; each dance is drastically different in period and style from the others.