Posts Tagged 'education'

Griffiths captures ‘survivor’ women to spotlight aid work

Griffiths captures ‘survivor’ women to spotlight aid work

On her last visit to Chautauqua, Annie Griffiths, the first woman photographer for National Geographic, made a life-changing decision. That summer, she recounted in her morning lecture at 10:45 a.m. Tuesday in the Amphitheater, she decided to found Ripple Effect Images, a non-profit organization that sends top photographers and videographers to document the work of aid programs that help impoverished women and girls. Their images and videos help these organizations fundraise and spread awareness.

Justice Kennedy: ‘We must know our heritage and our history’

Justice Kennedy: ‘We must know our heritage and our history’

In the eyes of Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Americans take their freedom for granted. As he spoke to the Chautauquans packed in and around the Hall of Philosophy at 3:30 p.m. Monday, he drew upon history and tradition to illustrate how vital it is that Americans engage in the discussion of freedom.
He admitted that in his younger years, he thought democracy could be given like a gift. He joked that some people think they can introduce democracy to a country, wipe their hands and say goodbye, and then democracy will be magically “installed.”

Roots of Chautauqua: radical to see and to understand

Roots of Chautauqua: radical to see and to understand

It takes one to know one; that is truism. To see, one must understand; to understand, one must see: that is truth. Or is it French? Or is it radical?

“Too often, ‘radical’ has been taken to be someone who is left-wing or using extreme means to accomplish reform,” said Jon Schmitz, Chautauqua archivist and historian. “But it really means someone going to the root of the matter to solve a problem.”

Schmitz will present “Four Radicals at Chautauqua: Fr. Edward McGlynn on the Single Tax, Arabella B. Buckley on Modernism in Religion, John Dewey on Education, Arnold Schoenberg and Serialism.”

Part of the Oliver Archives Heritage Lecture Series, the presentation is at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ.

Sullivan: Honor code, communication cultivates culture of honor, integrity

Sullivan: Honor code, communication cultivates culture of honor, integrity

Honor codes within the education system can instill a long-lasting culture of honor and integrity.

Teresa A. Sullivan, president of the University of Virginia, framed Friday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater around how communities can maintain a culture of those traits to end Week Seven, themed “The Ethics of Cheating.”

The millennial generation, which includes anyone born since 1980, can be characterized by several key traits, Sullivan said. Those individuals are more confident, more team- and peer-oriented, more inclined to rely on peers for reinforcement and approval, face increased pressure to succeed, and focused on the future and long-term career success.

U.Va.’s Sullivan speaks on building, maintaining communities of trust

U.Va.’s Sullivan speaks on building, maintaining communities of trust

Can integrity come from a single act? Or is it something one must live and uphold every second of every day?

At 10:45 a.m. Friday, Teresa A. Sullivan, president of the University of Virginia, will close out the Week Seven morning lecture series by trying to answer the question, “How can we maintain a culture of honor and integrity?”

As the leader of an institution with one of the nation’s foremost models of academic honesty, Sullivan brings perspective from a place where honor and ethical living mean vowing against all types of lying, cheating and stealing, and have been historically entrenched in the institution since the 19th century.