Posts Tagged 'Congress'

Rosen examines Constitution’s place in today’s privacy debate

Rosen examines Constitution’s place in today’s privacy debate

Jeffrey Rosen works in constitutional heaven. The CEO and president of the National Constitution Center lives out what he called his life’s passion, discussing and moderating dialogue on modern constitutional arguments. Rosen will speak at 10:45 a.m. today in the Amphitheater, beginning this week’s morning lecture series on “The Ethics of Privacy.”

Chautauqua conversations: For Goldman, a life of politics, service and Chautauqua summers

Chautauqua conversations: For Goldman, a life of politics, service and Chautauqua summers

There would be no relaxed porch conversation this time. A meatloaf was needed for a Chautauqua neighborhood potluck that night, so multi-tasking was necessary. In her cozy kitchen on the grounds, longtime women’s rights activist Pat Goldman reflected on a distinguished public career which has been punctuated and complemented by her long association with Chautauqua. Goldman was brought to Chautauqua Institution by her first husband, Charles Goodell. After his death, she introduced Chautauqua to her present husband, Steve Kurzman. Among her many links to the Institution are terms served on the Chautauqua Foundation Board of Directors and the Institution’s board of trustees. When they’re not in Chautauqua, she and her husband live in Washington, D.C.

Fineberg to address creating ‘culture of health’

Fineberg to address creating ‘culture of health’

Harvey Fineberg thinks the Affordable Care Act is a significant step in the right direction of health care reform, but he feels it doesn’t do enough to address the need for better care at an affordable cost.

Fineberg serves as president of the Institute of Medicine, an independent organization that provides unbiased advice on issues in biomedical science, medicine and health. He will speak at today’s 10:45 a.m. morning lecture in the Amphitheater on three issues he feels the United States must address to create a “culture of health.”

Potter: Rising election costs have corrupting effect on elected officials

Potter: Rising election costs have corrupting effect on elected officials

The 2012 election was one of many firsts. It was the first presidential election in which corporations had First Amendment rights. It was the first federal election with hundreds of millions of dollars of “secret money” spent. And it was the first election since 1972 in which neither presidential candidate participated in the public spending system.
What was the result of this election of firsts? An unprecedented amount of campaign spending: $7 billion.

“That is a 337 percent increase in spending since 1992,” said Trevor Potter, the founder of the Campaign Legal Center in Washington, D.C.

Potter to detail power of money in political processes

Potter to detail power of money in political processes

The issue of campaign financing lies at the intersection of money and politics, of morality and economics, and Trevor Potter thinks it’s time for a change.

At today’s morning lecture at 10:45 a.m. in the Amphitheater, Potter will show Chautauquans how the current system of campaign finance came to be. He is the founding president and general counsel of the Campaign Legal Center, a nonpartisan “watchdog” in campaign finance, elections, political communication and government ethics.

Lessig to address corrosive influence of money in US politics

Lessig to address corrosive influence of money in US politics

For politicians, a modern translation of “the love of money is the root of all evil” might read “the need for money is the root of all evil.” Consider the $350 million spent by both 2012 presidential campaigns for television advertising in nine swing states, and the need is immediately understood.

Society tends to get queasy with such old fashioned terms. Lawrence Lessig, director of the Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics at Harvard University and Harvard Law School, might eschew “the root of all evil” part. Then again, he might not. He is, after all, persuaded “that money is a corrupting influence in Congress.”

Lessig will explore the distance between campaign funders and the people at 3 p.m. Saturday in a presentation he titles “Mind the Gap.” The lecture is part of the Chautauqua Women’s Club’s Contemporary Issues Forum at the Hall of Philosophy.