Posts Tagged 'comedy'

LaRoche brings inspirational comedy act and songs to Amphitheater tonight

LaRoche brings inspirational comedy act and songs to Amphitheater tonight

“It’s got to be me,” Loretta LaRoche sings as she ogles herself in a handheld mirror on stage, a jazz quartet playing in the background. It’s a new parody song she’s been working on — bringing together the absurdity of everyday life and American jazz music in a hilarious combination. The piece comments on the selfie outbreak among millennials in a spoof of the classic “It Had To Be You,” made famous by Frank Sinatra.

Irreverent reverence from classical comedy duo tonight in the Amp

Irreverent reverence from classical comedy duo tonight in the Amp

“Do you know Pisa?” asked violinist Aleksey Igudesman. “There’s the Leaning Tower. The funny thing is, not just the tower is leaning in Pisa. Even the stage we were on, in a beautiful theater — it was leaning so much I had vertigo, because I thought I was going to fall down.”

“I have walked on some stages and been very frightened, yes,” agreed Hyung-ki Joo, pianist and the other half of the classical music comedy duo performing their show, “A Little Nightmare Music,” at 8:15 p.m. tonight in the Amphitheater.

“I’ve been frightened of the stage, because it swooped down into this black pit,” Joo said, making arm motions as if to keep himself from falling.

It is easy not to have stage fright doing what they do, because what they do is unique, hilarious, smart and offers the revelation that comedy, classical music, popular culture and celebrity make a surprising and fantastic mix.

Wolitzer discusses women in writing, humor advice

Wolitzer discusses women in writing, humor advice

Audience members erupted into laughter time and time again as Meg Wolitzer and Roger Rosenblatt exchanged witty remarks during Wednesday’s morning lecture.

The humor and wit seeded throughout the conversation demonstrated Wolitzer’s philosophy on its use in novels.

“Humor in a novel has to exist the way humor in a conversation exists,” she said. “It comes out of character.”

Between the jokes and laughter, Rosenblatt and Wolitzer discussed female authors, decisions writers make and character development in novels.