Posts Tagged 'Civil War'

Waugh to explore the ‘truthful history’ of Civil War

Waugh to explore the ‘truthful history’ of Civil War

It was the summer of 1885, and Ulysses S. Grant was dying.

Penniless and ravaged with terminal throat cancer, Grant took a northbound train from his home in New York City to supporter Joseph W. Drexel’s Adirondack cottage in Wilton, N.Y. It was in an old wicker chair on Drexel’s porch that former President Grant would spend his final days, drafting his memoirs at a furious pace.

Franklin’s tools of liberation: Big ideas, expressed through beautiful language

Franklin’s tools of liberation: Big ideas, expressed through beautiful language

It was Jan. 1, 1863, and Abraham Lincoln was supposed to sign the Emancipation Proclamation. Morning and midday passed, and he still hadn’t signed it. The Rev. Robert M. Franklin, Wednesday’s Interfaith Lecturer, said that slaves and abolitionists across the country began to worry that Lincoln had backed out.

Lincoln had a full schedule that day. He made it to his office to sign the document only after attending a number of New Year’s Day receptions, and then he had to wait for the Proclamation to be rewritten because of a typographical error. But then there was another delay: Lincoln needed time to massage his right arm before he could write a proper signature; he claimed his arm was nearly paralyzed from shaking hands since 9 a.m. that morning.

Gordon-Reed to delve into lost opportunities during Reconstruction era

Gordon-Reed to delve into lost opportunities during Reconstruction era

“It is unwise and dangerous to pursue a course of measures which will unite a very large section of the country against another section of the country, however much the latter may preponderate,” President Andrew Johnson said in a veto message to the U.S. Senate on Feb. 19, 1866.

Believing the provisions in the bill to be unwarranted by the Constitution, Johnson dismissed a bill aiming to establish an agency for the relief of freedmen and refugees after the Civil War. Historians today are exploring the consequences of decisions such as this one made in the Reconstruction era.

Gallagher: Gettysburg, Vicksburg are ‘Flashy,’ but clearly not Civil War’s turning points

Gallagher: Gettysburg, Vicksburg are ‘Flashy,’ but clearly not Civil War’s turning points

The BBC, National Geographic, standardized tests, Ken Burns and “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” don’t appear to have much in common. But their common thread is that they’ve all characterized the Battle of Gettysburg as the turning point in the American Civil War. And, according to historian Gary Gallagher, they’re all wrong.

Gallagher, a professor of American history at the University of Virginia, presented Wednesday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater on how human memories of events and the actual events are often conflicting, which may result in painting a picture of historical events that is not completely accurate.

Brazile: ‘Political emancipation demands and requires economic emancipation’

Brazile: ‘Political emancipation demands and requires economic emancipation’

Emancipation is not just a political event; it is a multifaceted process toward a just and post-racial society.
“The legal end of slavery did not immediately bring physical freedom to all former slaves,” Donna Brazile said of the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. “Oppression and suppression — servitude, if not slavery — [kept] a lot of black people in the South for generations after the Civil War.”

Morning Lecture guest column: The year of Gettysburg and Vicksburg: Was 1863 a turning point?

Morning Lecture guest column: The year of Gettysburg and Vicksburg: Was 1863 a turning point?

A dominant theme of the sesquicentennial observance of the Civil War identifies 1863 as its decisive military turning point. This interpretation echoes popular American culture over the past 75 years. Novelists William Faulkner and Michael Shaara, in Intruder in the Dust (1948) and The Killer Angels (1974), respectively, present the Battle of Gettysburg as the conflict’s riveting moment of truth. Ken Burns’ widely heralded documentary “The Civil War,” first aired on PBS in 1990 and rebroadcast frequently over the following years, devotes far more attention to Gettysburg than to any other battle. Innumerable columnists, from all parts of the ideological spectrum, have weighed in recently to identify Gettysburg as the pivotal moment of the war, and a special edition of National Geographic labels the battle “a fight that would last three days and turn the war’s tide.”

Von Drehle: Lincoln had ‘phenomenal vision of America’

Von Drehle: Lincoln had ‘phenomenal vision of America’

The man who would grow up to save the Union and become unilaterally known as one of the greatest presidents in the United States’ history was born in a one-room shack to a sick mother and a father who struggled to make a living as a farmer.
One could say Abraham Lincoln came from humble beginnings.

Journalist and author David Von Drehle explored these humble beginnings and the man these circumstances shaped in his morning lecture on Tuesday in the Amphitheater. Von Drehle is the author of Rise to Greatness: Abraham Lincoln and America’s Most Perilous Year.

Von Drehle lecture to trace Lincoln’s ‘Rise to Greatness’

Von Drehle lecture to trace Lincoln’s ‘Rise to Greatness’

Most children leave Disneyland with a souvenir photo or a pair of Mickey Mouse ears. Seven-year-old David Von Drehle carted home a bust of Abraham Lincoln.

“I can’t ever remember a time when I wasn’t interested in Abraham Lincoln,” Von Drehle said. “A lot of people, the more they know about him, the more they want to know, and that’s certainly the case with me.”

Clinton focuses on Civil War’s emotional impact

Clinton focuses on Civil War’s emotional impact

Steven Spielberg wanted Catherine Clinton to tell him everything she knew. In 2006, the director had already purchased the rights to Doris Kearns Goodwin’s upcoming book, A Team of Rivals, which told the story of Abraham Lincoln’s cabinet.

Spielberg filled a hotel suite in California with a team of scholars. Catherine Clinton, who opens Week Three’s “America, 1863” morning lectures at 10:45 a.m. today in the Amphitheater, was one of those scholars.