Posts Tagged 'Chaplain'

Chalker to preach from Amp pulpit in Week Six

Chalker to preach from Amp pulpit in Week Six

As Chautauqua chaplain for Week Six, the Rev. Kenneth Chalker will preach at the 10:45 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship service in the Amphitheater and describe his faith journey at Vespers at 5 p.m. in the Hall of Philosophy. From Monday through Friday, he will preach at the 9:15 a.m. Devotional Service in the Amphitheater.

Chalker’s topics for the week include: “Just Ask A Kid,” “Spiritual Physics,” “Carded At 63,” “Remembering It Word for Word,” “My Barbershop Quartet,” and “Stuck In A Hallway?”

Bible’s message is misinterpreted by clergy opposed to same-sex marriage

Bible’s message is misinterpreted by clergy opposed to same-sex marriage

Maybe President Obama’s motivation for “coming out” and affirming his support for same-sex marriage was politically calculated. Perhaps the president’s statement, as hard as it may be to imagine, had nothing to do with politics. Maybe, the president’s statement supporting an opportunity for a lesbian or gay couple to enter into a legally recognized, binding, civil, marriage covenant and contract was an expression of his true conviction.

But whatever his motivation, President Obama’s statement of support for same-sex marriage is far more genuine than the unholy response of opposition his statement has received from too many clergy. To be sure, the statements of ordained pastors — African-American in ethnicity or otherwise — thundering their opposition based on their view that God, through the Bible, teaches that marriage is between one man and one woman is just not true.

McMickle brings message of social justice to Amp pulpit

McMickle brings message of social justice to Amp pulpit

The Rev. Marvin A. McMickle will serve as chaplain for Week Five at Chautauqua. His sermon for the Sunday Morning Worship Service will be “Something Greater Than the Love of God.” He will share his faith journey at 5 p.m. Sunday Vespers and will speak each morning at the 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour. His sermon titles for the week include: “Does Our Gospel Still Offend?” “Because He Lives,” “Having the Faith to Endure,” “The Lengths and Limits of Love” and “Are You a Contagious Christian?”

McMickle is the 12th president of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School in Rochester, N. Y. Ordained to the Christian ministry in 1973 at Abyssinian Baptist Church of New York City, he also served on the pastoral staff there.

Renowned preacher Taylor returns in Week Four

Renowned preacher Taylor returns in Week Four

The Rev. Barbara Brown Taylor, Butman Professor of Religion at Piedmont College in northeast Georgia, returns to Chautauqua Institution as chaplain-in-residence for Week Four of the 2012 Season.

Taylor will preach at the 10:45 a.m. Sunday Ecumenical Communion Service and will co-celebrate the Eucharist. She will share her faith jorney at the 5 p.m. Vespers.

Taylor will preach at the 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour Monday through Friday. Her sermon topics for the week follow the theme of water and include: “How to Lose Your Life Every Day,” “In the Beginning Was the Water,” “The Water Baby,” “When the Spigot Runs Dry,” “Bathing Deep” and “Even a Cup.”

‘Out of God’s most profound grace, a magnanimous giver’

‘Out of God’s most profound grace, a magnanimous giver’

“How surprising it is to let the gospel be the gospel. Matthew ends as climactically as anyone can imagine,” said the Rev. Mark Labberton at the Friday 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour. The Harold F. Reed Sr. chaplain for Week Three concluded his series of sermons from the gospel of Matthew with “The Ministry of the Unlikely.” His text was Matthew 28:16-20.

Labberton described an encounter with a couple at a dinner the night before a wedding where he was presiding.

“I would describe them as a ‘hot couple.’ They were physically sexualized and talked about the substances they abused and the way that affected their lives. I waited for them to ask what I did. When I told them I was a pastor, they said, out of nowhere: ‘We have Jesus too. And that’s what really matters, isn’t it?’ They conjured him out their own pantheon,” Labberton said.

Labberton encourages transformational model of preaching

Labberton encourages transformational model of preaching

“There are at least three models of preaching. One is information based, concepts and ideas that need to be conveyed. The second is inspiration, an attitude to be grasped. The third is entertainment, trying to get people’s attention. There are high and low versions of all of these models, and all preaching involves aspects of these models. I am more interested in a transformational model that is defined by the kingdom and is measured as our growing in likeness to Christ. This is what I want to encourage, inspire and enable.”

The Rev. Mark Labberton and I were talking on the back porch of the Amphitheater. I wanted to know more about his thoughts about preaching and about the work of Fuller Seminary’s Lloyd John Ogilvie Institute for Preaching, where he serves as director.

“When I came, the institute had been founded but was underdeveloped. I wanted that challenge,” Labberton said. “When I looked outside the church, I saw a human longing for what the Bible calls wisdom. Secular people would not call it that, but they want to know about the truth and character of God. Our context and our framing are key. We want a God who is grounded and rotted and yet endlessly nuanced and with a flexible framing.”

Labberton: ‘Will we actually do the truth?’

Labberton: ‘Will we actually do the truth?’

“God’s word comes to us in a very important, disruptive way. The danger is that we want to domesticate the word of God,” said the Rev. Dr. Mark A. Labberton, the Harold F. Reed Sr. chaplain for the week. Labberton is the Lloyd John Ogilvie associate professor of preaching and director of the Ogilvie Institute of Preaching at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif. His sermon was “An Undomesticated God,” and his text was Matthew 18: 1-6; 18-23.

“I love my dog; he is a domesticated animal. Every morning I ask my family what they are going to do that day, and they are full of ideas and hopes,” Labberton said. “I ask my dog what he is going to do, and he is always a dog; he is always going to be a dog. But we want to be more than human, or we are less than human. Our central challenge is to let God be the true and living God who is not domesticated, is not under our thumb, or our doctrine or our personality.”

Matthew is the perfect place to begin, Labberton said. Matthew drew from the Hebrew Scripture and looked back on the history of Israel.

Matthew’s genealogy of Jesus was “hardly the place to find the undomesticated God. It is the account of the bluest blood that can be,” he said. “There are many characters that could be sermons in themselves. But the most dramatic punctuation marks are Tamar, Rahab, Ruth and Bathsheba. We would not have expected to find them here. They are not the people who get named at the Thanksgiving dinner table. Maybe in the kitchen afterward or in the hall beforehand, but these are the people we tell the children not to mention at the table.

Labberton brings message of love, justice to Amp pulpit

Labberton brings message of love, justice to Amp pulpit

The Rev. Dr. Mark Labberton will be the chaplain in residence at Chautauqua for Week Three, preaching at 10:45 a.m. Sunday and at 9:15 a.m. Monday to Friday in the Amphitheater. He will share his faith journey at the 5 p.m. Sunday Vespers in the Hall of Philosophy.

Labberton is the Lloyd John Ogilvie Chair of Preaching and director of the Ogilvie Institute of Preaching at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif.

Having served in pastoral ministry for more than 25 years, Labberton was the senior pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Berkeley, Calif., for the past 17 years before joining the faculty at Fuller.

Minister to Queen will preach Week One

Minister to Queen will preach Week One

When you think of being chaplain to the Queen of England, you don’t normally expect a person who also has a hand in everyday ministry to a young man convicted of armed robbery, but the Rev. Alastair Symington has kept a presence in parish work while carrying a title that only 32 other people hold. Symington will be the chaplain for the first week of the 2011 Season at Chautauqua. He will preach at the opening worship service at 10:45 Sunday morning.