Posts Tagged 'Buddhism'

From West Coast, McLennan explores religious expansion

From West Coast, McLennan explores religious expansion

The Rev. Scotty McLennan, the dean for religious life at Stanford University, will examine the role of religion in the American West, specifically in California, the state he’s lived in for the last 14 years. He will give his lecture, titled “Religious Pluralism in the Developing American West,” at 2 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy.

Compassion key to ease suffering, Armstrong says

Compassion key to ease suffering, Armstrong says

T.S. Eliot wrote in the poem “Ash Wednesday,” “Because I cannot hope to turn again,/ Consequently I rejoice, having to construct something/ Upon which to rejoice.”

Karen Armstrong’s livelihood as an author of books on world religions is what she has constructed to find happiness. She was a Catholic nun before attempting teaching and even television broadcasting. These careers all ended disastrously.

Yuen to lecture on combating unhappiness with meditative practice

Yuen to lecture on combating unhappiness with meditative practice

To Elaine Yuen, knitting is the perfect companion to Buddhism. She sees the careful concentration and synchronization between the brain’s left and right sides as a perfect way to experience meditation — stitch by stitch.

Yuen has been a Shambhala Buddhist practitioner since the early 1970s. Her “Contemplative Knitting” class at the Shambhala Meditation Center of New York is one way she has worked to apply Buddhist teachings to contemporary life.

Hindu, Buddhist, Jain scholars offer Responses to ‘Journey of the Universe’

Hindu, Buddhist, Jain scholars offer Responses to ‘Journey of the Universe’

At Thursday’s Interfaith Lecture, three scholars representing the Eastern religions of Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism gave their responses to the film “Journey of the Universe.” The film sought to integrate modern science with the wisdom traditions of the world to inspire people to have a new and sustainable relationship with the earth.
The three scholars were David Haberman, representing Hinduism; Christopher Ives, Buddhism; and Christopher Chapple, Jainism.

Halifax: Personal stabilization key to avoiding elected numbness

Halifax: Personal stabilization key to avoiding elected numbness

At 3:15 p.m. Wednesday afternoon, a profound stillness swept through the Hall of Philosophy as Roshi Joan Halifax led the audience through a meditation that touched on death, grief and acceptance.

In the third installment of Week Three’s series based on the theme “Krista Tippett and Friends who Inspire, Commit, Act,” Halifax sat down with radio host and producer Tippett during the 2 p.m. Interfaith Lecture and discussed her life, Buddhist faith, inspirations and the vast and human concepts of death, compassion, grief — and neuroscience.

Halifax is a medical anthropologist and founder and abbot of the Upaya Zen Center. For the past 40 years, she has helped the dying and their families comprehend and grasp the reality of death and the rituals and feelings that go with the experience of dying. She has studied and written on topics such as death and compassion.

“Her wisdom about dying is informed by her wisdom about living,” Tippett said.

Halifax, Tippett discuss painful truths of death, impermanence of life

Halifax, Tippett discuss painful truths of death, impermanence of life

Joan Halifax has helped people die for more than 40 years.

Halifax, a self-described “midwife to the dying,” is a medical anthropologist and Buddhist teacher, or roshi, who works with dying people and their families. She works to reduce the physical, psychological, social and spiritual pain of death.

She will join radio producer and host Krista Tippett for a conversation about death as a part of life at 2 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy.

Tippett interviewed Halifax in the early years of her nationally syndicated radio program “On Being,” and she said she has wanted to come back to Halifax for years because their first conversation helped so many people.