Posts Tagged 'Amy-Jill Levine'

Levine: Parable of landowner and laborers teaches importance of generosity

Levine: Parable of landowner and laborers teaches importance of generosity

Unions, fair trade, corporate charities and the welfare state might not sound like typical biblical parable fare. But Amy-Jill Levine insisted in her lecture at 2 p.m. Friday in the Hall of Philosophy that the afternoon’s parable examined these relevant modern economic aspects.

In “Management and Non-Union Workers,” Levine’s last lecture of Week Eight, she examined the parable of the laborers in the vineyard, found in Matthew 20:1-16. Levine is a professor of New Testament and Jewish studies at Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School.

Levine: Don’t judge Biblical widows by their stereotype

Levine: Don’t judge Biblical widows by their stereotype

“Today, we’re going to talk about the widow and the judge. I have no clue what this thing means,” Amy-Jill Levine said. “The more I look at this, the more disturbed I get. The good news there is that if I’m disturbed by a parable, at least the parable is working.”

Levine, professor of New Testament and Jewish studies at Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School, returned to the Hall of Philosophy lectern at 2 p.m. Thursday to discuss the parable of the wily widow and the unjust judge. “Wiley Widow and Unjust Judge” was the fourth in the Week Eight lecture series theme, “Human Creativity, The Spark of the Divine.”

Levine: ‘Prodigal son’ forces reassessment of Bible’s other brother pairs

Levine: ‘Prodigal son’ forces reassessment of Bible’s other brother pairs

“I should admit right up front: I don’t like this kid,” Amy-Jill Levine said.

The kid in question was the prodigal son of Jesus’ parable.

Levine, a New Testament and Jewish studies professor at Vanderbilt University, continued her weeklong study of Jesus’ parables at 2 p.m. Wednesday in the Hall of Philosophy. In Wednesday’s lecture, “The Provocation of the Prodigal,” Levine examined the parable of the prodigal son. The parable comes from Luke 15:11-32.

Levine finds spark of the divine through storytelling

Levine finds spark of the divine through storytelling

When Amy-Jill Levine was little, she wanted to be the pope. Pope John XXIII was “good for the Jews,” as Levine’s mother said, got to live in Italy and eat spaghetti, was loved by everyone, got to ride around in a cool car and wave to people and was always on TV.

“You can’t,” responded Levine’s Jewish mother jokingly, “because you’re not Italian.”