Posts Tagged 'Alexander Gavrylyuk'

Shades of colors of sound

Shades of colors of sound

Alexander Gavrylyuk is coming to Chautauqua Institution during a week of debates on morality, economics and social contract theories. His reason is simple: Here, he is free.

“For a performer, it is the most important thing to be free onstage,” Gavrylyuk said, “to simply dissolve into the world of music and find artistic truth in every piece. Every good artist can really perform only when they’re free inside, when they feel liberated.”

Symphony’s 2013 Season marked by threes

Symphony’s 2013 Season marked by threes

Three may be the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra’s magic number this summer.

The CSO 2013 season features three world premieres: The Romeo and Juliet Project, a collaborative extravaganza featuring Chautauqua’s best in dance, theater and voice; Laurence Roman’s “Concertino for Flute and Orchestra,” featuring Richard Sherman, CSO principal flutist; and Michael Colina’s “Three Dances for Cello and Orchestra,” in which Jaime Laredo will conduct cellist Sharon Robinson, his wife.

There are also three evenings of anniversary performances. This year marks the 100th birthday of Benjamin Britten and Pyotr Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring,” as well as the 200th birthdays of Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner. CSO will honor each of these composers throughout the season.

Gavrylyuk caps off CSO’s sumptuous Saturday program

Gavrylyuk caps off CSO’s sumptuous Saturday program

Saturday evening proved quite sensational in the Amphitheater, where guest conductor Christopher Seaman and pianist Alexander Gavrylyuk offered outstanding work in the second of two concerts centered around the piano concerti of Sergei Rachmaninoff. Weather and Delta Airlines conspired to make me miss the first of these on Thursday; but Saturday’s program, sumptuously played by the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, was genuinely memorable. Fortunately, the concert was broadcast live via NPR affiliates in Buffalo and Pittsburgh.

Delfin learns how to master the piano with 2 renowned experts

Delfin learns how to master the piano with 2 renowned experts

Young pianist Michael Delfin has found the key to hitting all the right notes since working with two notable piano experts.

Alexander Gavrylyuk and Marina Lomazov spent this past week teaching and entertaining students and audiences alike.

“Honestly said, I don’t teach one-on-one,” Gavrylyuk said. “And Chautauqua is one of the few places that I do that.”

Ukrainian-born Gavrylyuk is internationally acclaimed at 28 years old. And he has already amounted many prize-winning performances and graced the stage with prestigious orchestras around the world.

Seaman, Gavrylyuk accompany CSO for evening of popular classical repertoire

Seaman, Gavrylyuk accompany CSO for evening of popular classical repertoire

Christopher Seaman does not like the word “hackneyed” and does not recognize the term “potboiler.” Great music is simply great, played once or a thousand times, and “Ride of the Valkyries” is one of those pieces of music.

Saturday night’s Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra concert at 8:15 p.m. in the Amphitheater will boom to life with the famous, robust brass line of Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyries” from Die Walküre, and does not let up from there. The CSO then launches into Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8 and concludes with the popular and stirring Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2, once again featuring Chautauqua favorite Alexander Gavrylyuk as guest piano soloist.

CSO, with Seaman, Gavrylyuk, performs with ‘real orchestral unity’

CSO, with Seaman, Gavrylyuk, performs with ‘real orchestral unity’

Thursday evening’s Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra concert featured return appearances by conductor Christopher Seaman, who made his debut last season, and Ukranian-born pianist Alexander Gavrylyuk, making his sixth season visit. High humidity after a morning downpour isn’t helpful to keeping instruments in tune outdoors, but that didn’t seem to affect these responsive players.

Seaman retired last year after 13 seasons with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, and he has conducted widely in Britain, Europe and with many American orchestras; like his fellow English-born conductor Simon Rattle, he began his career as a timpanist. He chose two extended works considered inadequate youthful works by their composers, both to be revised years later.

Gavrylyuk, Seaman return for two evenings of Rachmaninoff

Gavrylyuk, Seaman return for two evenings of Rachmaninoff

Alexander Gavrylyuk has been coming to Chautauqua every summer for the past six years. His first performance in Chautauqua followed his winning the First Prize, Gold Medal, and Best Performance of a Classical Concerto at the Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Masters Competition in 2005.

Christopher Seaman first conducted the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra last summer, and one of his concerts happened during the 16-hour power outage.

Tonight’s concert will spotlight Gavrylyuk playing Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 1, Op. 1 in F-sharp Minor, followed by Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 5. The program will open with Sibelius’ “Finlandia.”

Symphony embarks on a second season under many batons

Symphony embarks on a second season under many batons

At 8:15 p.m. Saturday, June 30, Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra will begin its 84th season under the Amphitheater roof. For the second season in a row, the CSO will not be under the familiar baton of a music director.

The orchestra instead will welcome 17 guest conductors to the Amp, along with 15 guest soloists. The conductors, several of whom will be new to Chautauqua, will conduct classics from Beethoven to Wagner, with a sprinkling of pops, opera selections and several contemporary works.

Mood for a Melody

Mood for a Melody

Many consider a week at the Chautauqua Institution a vacation, a chance for relaxation. For some, this comes in the form of engaging in social dialogue or listening to lectures; for others, it means watching the waves of Chautauqua Lake lap against grass and sand.

For Alexander Gavrylyuk, a visit to Chautauqua assumes no less than performing in front of thousands of spectators hanging on every whim of his keyboard.

From stage to classroom, Gavrylyuk returns to teach piano master classes

From stage to classroom, Gavrylyuk returns to teach piano master classes

In the past two weeks, the Chautauqua School of Music has held master classes with some of the most seasoned professionals in the music industry. These teachers have had successful solo and chamber music careers, and most hold positions in the most prestigious conservatories in the country.

Alexander Gavrylyuk is also a seasoned professional, soloing at major concert halls around the world and winning all the big-name competitions. Gavrylyuk holds his own on the list of distinguished master class coaches, but he’s only in his 20s.