Posts Tagged '2011 Week Two'

Lesenger uses master class to instruct singers on acting

Lesenger uses master class to instruct singers on acting

An opera production derives from the music, not the other way around, said Jay Lesenger, artistic/general director of Chautauqua Opera Company. Sometimes directors will have a concept in mind before delving into a production, but Lesenger said he believes in a firm understanding of opera and its traditions before interpreting the music for the stage.

“I’m not of the school that I have to do something different to make it true,” Lesenger said. “I’m all for innovation, but that’s not how I go about looking at a piece. I don’t say, ‘How can we do this differently?’ I just say, ‘How can we do it well?’”

Anderson, Parsons support Chautauqua through Scholar in Residence

Anderson, Parsons support Chautauqua through Scholar in Residence

From their porch at the Keystone, Ed Anderson and Joan Parsons can look down to the street below them where Anderson’s children, and now their grandchildren, learned to ride their bicycles, and across to the trees that Anderson, as a birder, studies with a careful eye.

Chautauqua is as much a part of Anderson and Parsons’ lives as they are a part of the Institution; this is their second season sponsoring the Scholar in Residence program, which ran from Tuesday to Thursday.

Having married into Chautauqua, Faust finds a place to grow family roots

Having married into Chautauqua, Faust finds a place to grow family roots

At 9:30 a.m., Sylvia Faust’s grandchildren are all down at the Boys’ and Girls’ Club, and Faust has a rare quiet moment. For most of the summer, this year-round Chautauqua resident has a full house.

Faust’s two children and five grandchildren spend much of the season with her, and she channels their energy into her own volunteer work on the grounds. Faust, a Chautauquan for almost a half-century, serves on the Chautauqua Foundation’s planned giving committee.

Vamos teaches master class on importance of musical family tree

Vamos teaches master class on importance of musical family tree

In the music world, teachers are family. Musicians can trace the lineage of their instructors through generations, forming a musical genealogical web.

Technique, fingerings and style are inherited from those teachers, but for students, after months and even years of working with the same teacher, it’s not about the basics. It’s about the personal connection that drives students to work even harder in the practice room because it is no longer a teacher who inspired them; it is a life-long friend.

From stage to classroom, Gavrylyuk returns to teach piano master classes

From stage to classroom, Gavrylyuk returns to teach piano master classes

In the past two weeks, the Chautauqua School of Music has held master classes with some of the most seasoned professionals in the music industry. These teachers have had successful solo and chamber music careers, and most hold positions in the most prestigious conservatories in the country.

Alexander Gavrylyuk is also a seasoned professional, soloing at major concert halls around the world and winning all the big-name competitions. Gavrylyuk holds his own on the list of distinguished master class coaches, but he’s only in his 20s.

One Fine Night

One Fine Night

When internationally acclaimed singer and songwriter Natalie Merchant comes to Chautauqua, it will be a homecoming of sorts.
Merchant is a native of nearby Jamestown, N.Y. Her earliest venture into the musical world was with the band 10,000 Maniacs, the members of which also hailed from Jamestown.

Merchant told NPR host Scott Simon that some of her prominent memories of Jamestown are the times she snuck into local bars when she was 16 years old to play shows.

Senate chaplain to speak on running without stumbling

Senate chaplain to speak on running without stumbling

One of the critical goals of government is to give people the ability to run without stumbling, said the Rev. Barry C. Black, the U.S. Senate chaplain.

At 2 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy, Black will explain in his lecture, “Running Without Stumbling,” that one of the government’s roles is to prepare people for “seasons of emergencies.”

Religion Dept. welcomes 16 leaders to Chautauqua

Religion Dept. welcomes 16 leaders to Chautauqua

A Methodist, a Presbyterian, a UCC and a rabbi walk into Chautauqua, and what do they find?

A safe place, space and time for interfaith dialogue through the New Clergy Program sponsored by the Department of Religion.

During this week, 16 religious leaders who have been out of school no more than seven years are participating in a unique seminar that uses the programs of Chautauqua to provide an interfaith experience.

Sandel brings ethics discussions to Amp, CLSC

Sandel brings ethics discussions to Amp, CLSC

A longtime visitor to Chautauqua’s Amphitheater, Harvard University professor Michael Sandel returns to ask the question: What’s the right thing to do?

Sandel will speak twice today. He will give a morning lecture at 10:45 a.m. in the Amphitheater, as well as a Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle lecture at 3:30 p.m. in the Hall of Philosophy. Sandel’s lectures come to Chautauqua nearing the end of the Week Two theme of “Applied Ethics: Government and the Search for the Common Good.”