Posts Tagged '2011 Week Eight'

Grohman to play ‘thank you’ recital

Grohman to play ‘thank you’ recital

Debbie Grohman is a fifth-generation Chautauquan who comes to the Institution every year for artistic and spiritual fulfillment. But it wasn’t until last year, when she had a bicycle accident, that she realized that Chautauqua also can be a place of healing.

Grohman, her husband, Willie LaFavor, and their son Andrew will perform a recital at 4 p.m. today in Elizabeth S. Lenna Hall in part to show their appreciation to the Chautauqua community for its support as Grohman spent months in physical therapy trying to regain the strength to play her clarinet.

Virtuosity and variety

Virtuosity and variety

Ten years ago, 17-year-old violinist Augustin Hadelich made his U.S. debut with the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra. He has been back to Chautauqua almost every summer since.

“It’s one of the first places that gave me a chance, gave me a shot when I was just starting out,” he said. “The whole time I was there, I felt like people were really rooting for me and supporting me, and every time I’ve been back, as well.”

Daugherty Society recognizes generous new members in Athenaeum luncheon

Daugherty Society recognizes generous new members in Athenaeum luncheon

On Aug. 12, the Chautauqua Foundation held the sixth annual Eleanor B. Daugherty Society luncheon to honor the many Chautauquans who provide for the Institution’s future by including Chautauqua in their estate plans by will, trust, as beneficiary of an IRA or through a gift of real estate. Members were recognized and rewarded by hearing from guest speaker C. Fred Bergsten, director of the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Bergsten was the 10:45 a.m. lecturer Aug. 12 in the Amphitheater.

Abrahamson lectures on creative solutions

Abrahamson lectures on creative solutions

In a political world of black and white, Joan Abrahamson lives in the gray.

As the founder of the Jefferson Institute and former assistant chief of staff to President George H. W. Bush, Abrahamson looks not to elected officials to transform public policy but to creative thinkers who live and breathe the issues at hand.

Haskins: Thinking for today can inspire creativity

Haskins: Thinking for today can inspire creativity

Col. Casey Haskins thinks Americans today are bloody monkeys in a cage.

He presented a scenario to explain: Five monkeys are put in a cage with bananas hanging from the ceiling. There is one stool in the cage, and when one monkey tries to take one of the bananas using the stool, bystanders spray all five monkeys with ice-cold water. This happens about three times.

Annual CPOA meeting covers tax cap, board of trustees nomination

Annual CPOA meeting covers tax cap, board of trustees nomination

The season’s second and final Chautauqua Property Owners Association annual meeting addressed the county budget and what Darin Schulz, director of finance for Chautauqua County, referred to as the “tax cap myth.”

The meeting, which was held at 9 a.m. Saturday in the Hall of Philosophy, is an annual event for the association, with the agenda focused on nominating a member to the board of trustees and addressing community concerns.

Community airs praise, concerns at Saturday’s Trustee Open Forum

Community airs praise, concerns at Saturday’s Trustee Open Forum

“The hardest part, to be candid, is to convey this place in all the various aspects… to someone who’s never see it before. It is brutally difficult because there aren’t comparisons, and if there are, they don’t work,” said Tom Becker, president of Chautauqua Institution.

Becker’s statement was in response to a question at the Trustee Open Forum, held directly after the Institution Corporation Annual Meeting at 10 a.m. Saturday in the Hall of Philosophy.