All posts by Nikki Lanka

Turkey not a model but a cautionary tale, says Prodromou

Turkey not a model but a cautionary tale, says Prodromou

At the Republic of Turkey’s founding in 1923, approximately 200,000 Greek Orthodox Christians lived in the country. Ninety years later, that number is about 2,000 — significantly less than 1 percent of the country’s entire population.

Those statistics, provided by Elizabeth Prodromou, make it difficult for her to consider Turkey a model of democracy for the Middle East. At today’s 2 p.m. Interfaith Lecture in the Hall of Philosophy, she’ll explain how the religious persecution that has been persistent since the fall of the Ottoman Empire makes Turkey more than anything a cautionary tale.

Cagaptay explores ‘yin and yang’ of Turkey’s cultural identity

Cagaptay explores ‘yin and yang’ of Turkey’s cultural identity

Turkey is a country split between continents, and it has a similarly bipolar cultural identity. Its political history is that of a secular democracy committed to Western institutions but its people are staunchly religious, with a Sunni Muslim majority.

Soner Cagaptay, the Beyer Family Fellow of the Turkish Research Program at the Washington Institute, will explore what he calls the “yin and yang of Turkishness” in today’s 2 p.m. Interfaith Lecture in the Hall of Philosophy.

Chane, replacing Indyk, to discuss Turkey’s role in shaping future of the Middle East

Chane, replacing Indyk, to discuss Turkey’s role in shaping future of the Middle East

Turkey may seem like an odd choice as peacemaker for Iran and the West. On a number of issues, the nation’s position is contrary to either side; it disagrees with Iran on the issues of Syria and Hezbollah and disagrees with the U.S. on Iran’s right to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

“Yet it still holds a place of being the most trusted partner to be able to broker a new way forward,” said the Right Rev. John Chane.

Bowen discusses lessons learned from fraud, lack of oversight in Iraq

Bowen discusses lessons learned from fraud, lack of oversight in Iraq

The United States assisted in the construction of a prison an hour north of Baghdad — a prison with a $40 million price tag that will never be used and was not wanted in the first place.

Khan Bani Saad Prison is just one example of the massive fraud, waste and abuse in the Iraq Reconstruction program. Stuart Bowen, the U.S. special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction, was tasked with auditing and inspecting the various projects of the Coalition Provisional Authority. Through 34 trips to Iraq and 390 audits and inspections, Bowen’s office saved $1.8 billion — money that may otherwise have been misused on projects like Khan Bani Saad Prison.

Fresh and Fiery: Jeremy Davis & the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra  bring big band swing, New Orleans spice to Amp stage

Fresh and Fiery: Jeremy Davis & the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra bring big band swing, New Orleans spice to Amp stage

In the seventh grade, Jeremy Davis and Clay Johnson experienced what might be the nightmare of every 13-year-old: Their mothers decided the two should be friends.

The boys didn’t really care to be buddies at the time, Johnson said, but their moms noticed they had identical class schedules. The two quickly became best friends and are now bandmates of Jeremy Davis & the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra. Davis directs the band and plays tenor saxophone, and Johnson sings.