All posts by Kelsey Burritt

Literary Arts Friends announce 2013 writing awards winners

Literary Arts Friends announce 2013 writing awards winners

The winners of the 2013 Literary Arts Awards were announced last Sunday on the porch of the Literary Arts Center at Alumni Hall. Any person who has visited Chautauqua Institution throughout the season was eligible to submit previously unpublished poetry or prose for the Young Writer Awards (ages 12 and under), Young Adult Awards (under 18) or the Adult Prose and Poetry awards (ages 18 and older).

Better than a Hallelujah: Grant returns to Chautauqua to perform songs new and old, with family

Better than a Hallelujah: Grant returns to Chautauqua to perform songs new and old, with family

In 2004, the last time Amy Grant performed at Chautauqua, she brought her bike. She may be a six-time Grammy Award-winning singer, but, when it comes to biking, she considers herself more of a Katherine Hepburn than a Lance Armstrong.

“I certainly don’t have the kind of expendable income that would allow me to travel on a whim,” Grant said, “but because I travel with work … I’ve been to maybe a hundred different cities in a year. And sometimes some pretty remote and amazing parts of the country, and that’s why I take my bike; that’s why we try to hike or look around.”

Gilfillan to unpack reform’s effects on health insurance, delivery systems

Gilfillan to unpack reform’s effects on health insurance, delivery systems

Not in his wildest dreams did Richard Gilfillan hope to see the likes of the Affordable Care Act. By addressing issues in the health care insurance marketplace as well as in delivery systems, the Affordable Care Act exceeded the expectations of Gilfillan and many other health care professionals.

In fact, Gilfillan left his position as head of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation, where he worked for three years, this past June, citing a curiosity to explore the multitude of opportunities produced by the Affordable Care Act.

Weber celebrates son’s life in family memoir

Weber celebrates son’s life in family memoir

Damon Weber would have turned 25 on Aug. 8. The vivacious, red-haired boy wanted to be an actor and, unlike most of his friends, he was not afraid to talk to girls. Damon was also born with a malformed heart and had two open-heart surgeries by the time he was 4. At age 13, Damon was diagnosed with a rare, life-threatening disease called protein-losing enteropathy.

Damon died three years later, on March 30, 2005. He was 16-and-a-half years old.

Season’s readings: Babcock announces three 2014 CLSC selections at annual Bryant Day celebration

Season’s readings: Babcock announces three 2014 CLSC selections at annual Bryant Day celebration

This last Saturday was Bryant Day, a tradition that marks the official start of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle reading season. The ceremony featured Sherra Babcock, vice president and Emily and Richard Smucker Chair for Education, announcing the first three selections of the year: Maya’s Notebook by Isabel Allende, What I Did by Christopher Wakling, and The Names of Things by John Colman Wood. The three novels fall within the season’s vertical theme, “Exploration and Discovery,” which honors Week Five’s morning lecture theme and the second interarts collaborative project on the American West.