Amp usher Burnett uses found thread in her weavings

Amp usher Burnett uses found thread in her weavings

Think of Gina Burnett as the unofficial artist in residence of Chautauqua Institution’s Amphitheater. Burnett, wrapping up her third season as an Amphitheater usher, has the responsibility of scanning patrons into the Amp for the morning lecture and cleaning up after they leave. She has turned that clean-up process into an art project.

Conversations with Simon & Collins: Musician, poet talk shop on artistic process in Amp tonight

Conversations with Simon & Collins: Musician, poet talk shop on artistic process in Amp tonight

“Chautauqua’s very hard to describe,” said Billy Collins, former poet laureate of the United States, “as anyone who’s asked to describe it probably says.”

This marks Collins’ fourth visit to the Institution. He noted that whenever he comes to Chautauqua, it seems to involve some time-travel to a simpler, more thoughtful time. He described the place’s origins as very philosophical, which perhaps explains why so many people on the grounds are buzzing about the chance to spend their Friday nights watching a conversation between a poet and a musician.

Chautauquans get sneak peek of artists’ life at Open Studios night

Chautauquans get sneak peek of artists’ life at Open Studios night

At Open Studios night last Monday at the School of Art, the first thing 7-year-old Jackson Kuhn did was make a beeline for art student Molly Berger’s ceramics studio. He traded a rock he painted — and autographed on the back — for one of her mugs. Kuhn loves ceramics; he takes classes in it through the Special Studies’ Young Artists program, and he started selling painted rocks last year to raise money for a ceramics student scholarship through the Chautauqua Fund.

Ross assesses U.S. interventionist policies in three key countries

Ross assesses U.S. interventionist policies in three key countries

In 2008, Dennis Ross was asked by Vanity Fair if he thought the map presented by T.E. Lawrence to the Paris Peace Conference in 1919 could be applied to the Middle East today. Ross said the notion was inconceivable. But five years later, Ross said he believes the map — which separates countries of the Middle East by their individual tribes, sects and clans — may have “a lot of possibility.”

“This is not the Middle East that you knew before,” he said. “It is a Middle East that is changing.”